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College of Science

Psychology

Professor teaching classwww.psyc.vt.edu/

University Exemplary Department
Jack W. Finney, Chair
University Distinguished Professor: T. H. Ollendick
Heilig-Meyers Professor: R. A. Winett
Professors: G. A. Clum; H. J. Crawford; J. W. Finney; J. E. S. Geller; R. T. Jones
Associate Professors: D. K. Axsom; M.A. Bell; R. P. Cooper; J. J. Donovan; R. J. Foti; B. H. Friedman; J. Germana; D. W. Harrison; R. J. Harvey; N. M. A. Hauenstein; A. Scarpa; R. S. Stephens
Assistant Professors: L.D. Cooper; J. C. Dunsmore
Visiting Assistant Professor: K. A. Hoffman
Affiliated Faculty: D. L. Brinberg; B. V. Corsino; W. D. Crews; R. H. Crouse; S. B. Gustafson; A. D. Hamilton; B. Klein; C. A. Lease; R. E. Lickliter; R. S. Schulman; T. Smith-Jackson; D. R. Southard; J. B. Weaver; R. C. Williges
Career Advisor: Cindy Koziol (231-5388)


Overview

    The Department of Psychology offers programs leading to the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. To graduate with a major in psychology, the undergraduate student must complete the core curriculum requirements of the College of Science and the following departmental requirements:

    A minimum of 28 hours of psychology including Psyc 2004, 2044, 2094, and three 4000-level courses, at least one with laboratory (Psyc 4964, 4974, and 4994 are not counted as 4000-level courses for purposes of this requirement). At least 21 semester hours must be in courses other than Psyc 2964, 2974, 2994, 4964, 4974, or 4994.

    Successful completion of at least one of the following statistics courses:

    STAT 2004: Introductory Statistics
    STAT 3005 or 3006: Statistical Methods
    STAT 3604: Statistics for the Social Sciences
    STAT 3615 or 3616: Biological Statistics

    In addition to courses used to fulfill the Scientific Reasoning and Discovery requirement (Area 4) of the College of Science Core Curriculum, two courses (6 semester hours) in one of the following areas: biology, chemistry, physics. These additional courses need not be in the same discipline as courses used to satisfy Area 4 of the College of Science Core.

    Successful completion of two courses (6 semester hours) from the disciplines of computer science, philosophy, and/or statistics. These courses may either be in the same discipline or from any two of the three disciplines. Courses used to satisfy College of Science Core requirements or other Psychology department requirements may not also be used to satisfy this requirement.

    To graduate with a minor in psychology, the undergraduate student must complete 18 hours of psychology including Psyc 2004, 2094, and one 4000-level course (Psyc 2964 and 4964 may not be used toward the psychology minor).

    A program leading to the B.S. in psychology "in honors" is available for eligible students. Additionally, opportunities are provided for students to engage in a directed program of independent research. The department sponsors a chapter of Psi Chi, the national psychology honor society, and the Psychology Club. A Cooperative Education Program is available in which a student may alternate a semester of study with a semester of employment. Additional information on this program is provided in the "Academics" chapter of this catalog. Information about these and other activities is available at the Academic Advising Center Office (109 Williams Hall) which is located in the Department of Psychology.

Satisfactory Progress

    University policy requires that students who are making satisfactory progress toward a degree meet minimum criteria toward the University Core (see Academics chapter in this catalog), toward the College of Science Core (see above), and toward the degree in psychology.

    Satisfactory progress toward the B.S. in psychology requires that:

  1. Upon having attempted 30 semester hours (including transfer, advanced placement, advanced standing, credit by examination, freshman rule), students must have an overall GPA of 2.00 and must have completed the following course:

    Psyc 2004: Introduction to Psychology

  2. Upon having attempted 72 semester hours, students must have an overall GPA of 2.0 and have completed the following courses:

    Psyc 2094: Principles of Psychological Research
    STAT 3604 or a statistics course approved to fulfill the psychology department requirement
    One additional three credit psychology course

  3. Upon having attempted 92 semester hours, students retain an in-major GPA of 2.00 or above.

Undergraduate Courses (PSYC)

2004: INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY
The scientific study of behavior, behavioral research methods and analysis, and theoretical interpretations. Survey of basic behavioral processes from sensory and physiological mechanisms to personality types and complex decision-making in humans. An Honors Section of this course may be offered. Requires enrollment in 1 hour (0 credit) recitation. (2H,3C)

2034: DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY
Basic principles of human psychological development from the prenatal period through old age are examined. Surveys recent literature within the areas of perceptual, cognitive, and social/emotional development. Pre: 2004. (3H,3C)

2044: PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING
Survey of fundamental concepts, phenomena, and principles of learning, such as reinforcement, Pavlovian conditioning and retention/forgetting. Issues addressed are traditional views of learning, biological and cognitive constraints, the role of animal models, and the utility of learning theory. Pre: 2004. (3H,3C)

2054: PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY
Study of human personality and psychological adjustment: theory and research. Behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, and environmental determinants of personality. Psychological adjustment and personality development. Pre: 2004. (3H,3C)

2064: NERVOUS SYSTEMS & BEHAVIOR
Introduction to the workings of the nervous system and the relation between those workings and behavior. Special emphasis on human nervous systems and behavior. Pre: 2004. (3H,3C)

2074: ANIMAL BEHAVIOR
Study of animal behavior: Comparative psychology and ethology, behavioral genetics, evolution of behavior, ecological aspects of behavior, predation, reproduction, and parental care. Some consideration is given to the relevance of animal behavior to human behavior. Pre: 2004. (3H,3C)

2084: SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
Introduction to the social behavior of the individual and the group: social perception, attribution theory, attitude formation and change, interpersonal attraction, aggression and conflict, group dynamics, applied social psychology.
Pre: 2004. (3H,3C)

2094: PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH
Research design and methodology. Analysis of a variety of approaches to developing, understanding, and interpreting psychological data. Pre: 2004. (3H,3C)

2964: FIELD STUDY
Pass/Fail only. Variable credit course. X-grade allowed.

2974: INDEPENDENT STUDY
Variable credit course.

2984: SPECIAL STUDY
Variable credit course.

2994: UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
Variable credit course.

3014: ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY
Survey of various types of psychological disorders and of contrasting theoretical views and representative research on the etiology and prognosis of these disorders. Emphasis on diagnosis and classification of disorders. Pre: 2004. (3H,3C)

3024: ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY
Survey of the effects of the environment on humans, and vice versa. Topics include crowding, noise, air, and water pollution and their effects on behavior. Research and theories about person-environment relations. Pre: 2004. (3H,3C)

3034: PSYCHOLOGICAL DISORDERS OF CHILDREN
An examination of theory, research, and practice as related to the assessment, treatment, and prevention of psychological disorders of children. Special emphasis on the understanding of child behavior disorders from a developmental, clinical-experimental point of view. Pre: 2004, 3014. (3H,3C)

3044: BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION
Major principles and techniques available to modify behavior, particularly pathological behavior. Emphasis placed on environmental manipulations which serve to modify behavior. Pre: 2004, 2044, 3014. (3H,3C)

3054: HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY
Major theories, strategies, and methods for understanding psychological contributions to health and disease; psychological approaches to the treatment and prevention of disease and unintentional injuries, and health and safety promotion.
Pre: 2004. (3H,3C)

3154 (EDCI 3154): PSYCHOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION
Emphasizes theories of human learning and the relationship of learning principles to educational practice. Within the context of both cognitive and behavioral models of learning, attention is given to instructional procedures, student motivation and discipline, and the assessment of educational progress. Pre: 2004. (3H,3C)

4014: HISTORY AND SYSTEMS IN PSYCHOLOGY
Overview of modern theories in psychology by consideration of current historical controversies. Traces roots of psychology in natural and social sciences. Considers the diversity of psychological study and the future of psychology. Senior standing in psychology required for undergraduate credit. Graduate standing required for graduate credit. (3H,3C)

4024: INDUSTRIAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY
Overview of psychological theories, research findings, and methods relevant to studying the behavior of individuals in organizations. Topics covered may include prediction of job performance, personnel testing, training and development, and leadership. Pre: 2004, STAT 3604. (3H,3C)

4034: ADVANCED DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY
Development of attention, cognition, social skills, language, personality, and intelligence throughout the life-span: an in-depth, critical evaluation of current
research and theory. Pre: 2004, 2034. (3H,3C)

4044: ADVANCED LEARNING
Critical analysis of basic paradigms of Pavlovian and Instrumental Conditioning with emphasis on general theories of learning and issues involved in cognition, reinforcement, and memory. Pre: 2004, 2044, 2094. (3H,3C)

4054: PERSONALITY RESEARCH
Research techniques used in contemporary personality psychology: case histories, correlational methods, experimentation, archival studies, and psychobiography. Pre: 2004, 2054, 2094, STAT 3604. (3H,3C)

4064: PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY
Presentation of concepts important for the study of neuroscience and behavior with a special emphasis on the classic topics of physiological psychology: brain-behavior relations, sensory integration, physiological correlates of motivation and emotion. Pre: 2004, 2064, 2094. (3H,3C)

4074: SENSATION AND PERCEPTION
Overview of sensory and perceptual systems and their integration in influencing behavior. Emphasis on sensory receptor characteristics, neural structure, psychophysical data, perceptual phenomena and issues, theories about the human perceptual process. Pre: 2004, 2064, 2094. (3H,3C)

4084: ADVANCED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
Examines social behavior from four major theoretical orientations: reinforcement, field theory, cognitive, and role theory. Topics may include social learning, social exchange theories, group processes, attitude, and person perception. Pre: 2004, 2084. (3H,3C)

4094: THEORY OF PSYCHOLOGICAL MEASUREMENT
Theory of psychological measurement and techniques used to develop and evaluate psychological measures. Coverage of standardization, measurement scales, reliability, validity, score transformations, composite scores, weighted scores, and test construction. Pre: 2004, 2094, STAT 3604. (3H,3C)

4104: MOTIVATION
Overview of concepts, phenomena, principles, and theories of motivation from biological, learning, social and cognitive viewpoints. Pre: 2004, 2044, 2094. (3H,3C)

4114: COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY
An experimentally-oriented survey of human cognitive processes which include attention, memory, and decision making. Role of individual difference variables in each area. Pre: 2004, 2044, 2094. (3H,3C)

4124 (EDCI 4124): PSYCHOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION FOR PRESERVICE TEACHERS
Emphasizes applying human learning and developmental theories to the classroom setting with a focus on instructional processes and procedures, student motivation, classroom management, and assessment strategies. Participation in a 4-year or 5-year teacher education program. Junior level standing. Pre: 2004 or HD 1004. (3H,3C)

4174 (EDCI 4174): STUDENTS WITH EMOTIONAL AND BEHAVIORAL DISORDERS
This course examines the characteristics and needs of individuals with emotional and behavioral disorders. Topics include history, definitions and causes of emotional and behavioral disorders, major research findings, identification procedures, educational programming and current issues. Co: EDCI 3144. (2H,2C)

4204: LABORATORY IN MOTIVATION
Experimental techniques for studying motivation in humans and animals including deprivation procedures, expectancy manipulations, verbal instructions, incentive variables, care and maintenance of animals, and techniques for measuring frequency, latency, and magnitudes of responding. Co: 4104. (3L,1C)

4214: COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY LABORATORY
Design, operation, and analysis of experiments to study human cognitive processes (e.g., attention, memory, and decision-making). Co: 4114. (3L,1C)

4234: LABORATORY IN DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY
Research design and implementation in the study of perceptual and motor development, language development, cognitive development, and social development.
Pre: 2004, 2034. Co: 4034. (3L,1C)

4244: LABORATORY IN ADVANCED LEARNING
Experimental techniques for studying the development, maintenance, and retention of behavior change in humans and animals. Laboratory exercises in Pavlovian and Instrumental Conditioning, verbal learning and memory. Co: 4044. (3L,1C)

4254: PERSONALITY RESEARCH LABORATORY
Laboratory course in personality research techniques. Emphasis on experimental, archival, questionnaire, and psychobiographical approaches. Co: 4054. (3L,1C)

4264: LABORATORY IN PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY
Experimental techniques in the area of physiological psychology including: handling and care of laboratory animals, anesthetic and surgical techniques, and measurement of physiological variables. Co: 4064. (3L,1C)

4274: LABORATORY IN SENSATION AND PERCEPTION
Overview of the major experimental techniques and phenomena of sensation and perception. Emphasis on psychophysical methods, signal detection, dark adaptation, perceptual illusions. Co: 4074. (3L,1C)

4284: LABORATORY IN SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
Design, performance, and analysis of experiments in social psychology. Various methodologies used in social research (e.g., laboratory experimentation, field observations) will be studied through actual performance of experiments. Co: 4084. (3L,1C)

4294: LABORATORY IN PSYCHOLOGICAL MEASUREMENT
Design and implementation of psychological assessment devices including issues of test construction, reliability, validity, standardizing, and detecting test bias.
Pre: 2004, 2094, STAT 3604. Co: 4094. (3L,1C)

4354: SENIOR SEMINAR
For Psyc majors. Intended to provide in-depth coverage and discussion of a small set of topics selected by members of the seminar. Consent required. (3H,3C)

4364: SENIOR SEMINAR
For Psyc majors. Intended to provide in-depth coverage and discussion of a small set of topics selected by members of the seminar. (3H,3C)

4964: FIELD STUDY
Pass/Fail only. Variable credit course. X-grade allowed.

4974: INDEPENDENT STUDY
Variable credit course.

4984: SPECIAL STUDY
Variable credit course.

4994: UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
Variable credit course.

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Virginia Tech 2005-06 Undergraduate Course Catalog and Academic Policies