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College of Engineering

Mechanical Engineering

www.me.vt.edu

Kenneth S. Ball, Head and L.S. Randolph Professor
George R. Goodson Professor: D.J. Inman
John R. Jones III Professor: Ranga Pitchumani
Roanoke Electric Steel Professor: C.R. Fuller
W. Martin Johnson Professor: A.J. Kurdila
Chris Kraft Professor of Engineering: W. F. Ng
J. Bernard Jones Professor: W.F. O'Brien
Professors: M. Ahmadian; K.S. Ball; R.C. Benson; E.F. Brown; R.A. Burdisso; T.E. Diller; S.M. Duma; C.R. Fuller; D.J. Inman; J.M. Kennedy; R.G. Kirk; A.J. Kurdila; D.J. Leo;
R.L. Mahajan; D.J. Nelson; W.F. Ng; W.F. O'Brien; R. Pitchumani; D. Tafti; J. Terpenny;
U. Vandsburger; M.R. von Spakovsky
Associate Professors: J. Bayandor; F. Battaglia; J.H. Bohn; C.L. Dancey; S. Ekkad;
M.W. Ellis; M.E.F. Kasarda; T. Furukawa; J.B. Ferris; H.C. Gabler; W. Hardy; D.W. Hong;
M.E. Johnson; A.A. Kornhauser; B. Lattimer; R. Mueller; M.R. Paul; S. Priya; M.J. Roan;
C. Sandu; S.C. Southward; S. Taheri; B. Vick; P.P. Vlachos; R.L. West; A.L. Wicks
Assistant Professors: J. Abiade; B. Behkam; N.C. Goulbourne; S. Huxtable; A. Leonessa; C.G. Rylander; N. Rylander; C. Williams
Research Associate Professors: K. Kochersberger; M.A. Pierson
Professors Emeritus: L.J. Arp; R.A. Comparin; N.S. Eiss; M. Furey; R.E. Hedgepeth; C.J. Hurst; J.B. Jones; R.G. Leonard; J. R. Mahan; W.H. Mashburn; L.D. Mitchell; R. Mitchiner; J. Moore; A. Myklebust; T.F. Parkinson; F.J. Pierce; H.H. Robertshaw; A.G. Szeless; J.R. Thomas; W.C. Thomas; R.J. Whitelaw
Adjunct Professors: R. Anderl (TU Darmstadt); P.G. Brolinson (Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine); D. Carlson (Lord Corp.); J. Funk (Biodynamic Research Corp.); M.J. Hampe (TU Darmstadt); T. Kress (BEST Engineering); D. Rabe (Air Force Research Lab); B. Sanders (Air Force Research Lab)

mechancial project and students

Nature of the Profession

    Mechanical engineering is the broadest of the engineering professions. Because of the breadth of the ME discipline, mechanical engineers work in a wide variety of technical areas and are employed in a range of job functions. Specialty areas within the mechanical engineering discipline include, among many others, acoustics, biomechanics, CAD, controls, energy conversion and energy management, HVAC, materials, mechanical design, mechatronics, nuclear engineering, robotics and automation, and turbomachinery. The actual job functions which mechanical engineers perform vary widely as well. ME's work in design, research and development, manufacturing, service and maintenance, as well as technical sales, in almost every industry. Many are in management and administration. Many mechanical engineering graduates go on to more advanced degrees, or continue their education in other fields, such a law or business.

Employment Opportunities

    Because of the diversity and breadth of the mechanical engineering profession, ME graduates find employment in a wide variety of industries, laboratories, and consulting firms. This results in a very stable job market that is not dependent upon a single particular industry. The textile, petroleum, chemical, electronic, automotive, aerospace, power generation, HVAC, and manufacturing industries hire relatively large numbers of mechanical engineering graduates and the starting salaries for ME's are very competitive with the other engineering disciplines

    Because of the wide diversity of specialties and job functions any two mechanical engineers might have significantly different day-to-day activities and responsibilities. Some may be concerned with very large engineering systems while others are working with small and even microscale devices and components; some work might call for highly analytical or mathematical approaches while other work might be more amenable to experimental or empirical approaches. Mechanical engineers may be involved in the operation of processing plants, or the design of engines, prosthetic devices, steam and gas turbines or compressors and pumps, alternative fuel devices, and many other devices and systems. At Virginia Tech there is a close association between the ME departments research and design project activities with industry. This enhances the opportunities for student interaction with industry representatives.

Mechanical Engineering Program Educational Objectives

    The ME program produces graduates who utilize the following attributes in their professional careers to attain the indicated achievements:

    1. fundamental technical knowledge and skills in mathematics, science, and engineering to recognize, analyze and solve problems, and to apply these abilities to the generation of new knowledge, ideas or products in industry or government; and to implement these solutions in practice.
    2. practical experience to work well in local and international team environments and to become effective written and oral communicators, both for communicating ideas to other people, mentoring, and for learning from others.
    3. recognition of the importance of and engagement in life-long learning, whether through self-study, continuing education courses or workshops, or through formal graduate level education, and encourage others to have this same motivation.
    4. understanding of ethical responsibility and service toward their peers, employers, and society and follow these precepts in their daily lives.

Program Outcomes

    We expect our students to have the following skills, knowledge, and behaviors by the time of their graduation. We want our students to attain:

    • an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
    • an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
    • an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
    • an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams
    • an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
    • an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
    • an ability to communicate effectively
      the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context
    • a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
    • a knowledge of contemporary issues
    • an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

    The Department of Mechanical Engineering at Virginia Tech is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, telephone: (410) 347-7700. One important objective of the Department of Mechanical Engineering is to ensure that every mechanical engineering graduate has the knowledge, ability, and understanding required to meet the basic ABET guidelines. The structure and sequence of courses is designed to provide these requirements for every graduate. The department is committed to providing students with an exceptional experience in both the theory and practice of mechanical engineering. In the senior capstone sequence, students are required to apply classroom knowledge to complex engineering problems requiring teamwork, problem formulation, economic analysis, effective communication, and product realization. These projects are carefully selected and updated to ensure relevancy to contemporary technical issues and needs. The department encourages the involvement of underclass students and students outside the department and college in these projects. The department also encourages hands-on student involvement by providing dedicated machine and welding shops that exclusively serve the undergraduate program. The required sophomore-level Manufacturing Processes Laboratory course and certification by a professional machinist are required prior to use of either of these shops. Opportunity for professional development is provided by participation in student professional organizations, such as the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, ASME, and the American Nuclear Society, ANS.

The Curriculum

    A total of 130 semester credits are required for graduation.

    The curriculum provides a strong foundation in the basic physical and chemical sciences and in mathematics. These are followed by a sequence of courses that provide a broad background in design methodology, computer programming, electronics, solid and fluid mechanics, manufacturing processes, system modeling, machine design, thermodynamics, heat and mass transfer, statistics and materials. Courses in English and in the humanities and social sciences are included to broaden the individual. This background is strengthened and unified through a sequence of engineering design and laboratory courses. Instructional laboratories in the junior and senior years provide opportunities for students to learn measurement and instrumentation techniques. Students apply these skills to the acquisition and analysis of data from various engineering systems.

    In all professional endeavors the mechanical engineer must consider ecological effects as well as the economic and social needs of people. The mechanical engineer must consider the conservation of natural resources and the environmental impact in the design of systems. These considerations are included in a number of ME courses and technical elective classes. Students wishing to further strengthen this area may wish to consider the Green Engineering Option at http://www.eng.vt.edu/green/index.php.

    The unifying activity in all aspects of mechanical engineering is the design function. A special emphasis has been placed on the use of computer-aided design methods and applied design project experience as a required part of the curriculum. Elective courses in the junior and senior years provide students with the opportunity to pursue specialized interests related to career plans or preparation for graduate study.

    The department participates in the Cooperative Education Program in which qualified students may alternate semesters of study with semesters of professional employment. Approximately twenty-five percent of all mechanical engineering students participate in this program.

    To prepare its students to function as true global engineers, the department offers in collaboration with its sister department at the Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany, the students the opportunity to complete their senior year at the other university and thus earn a BSME degree simultaneously from both univerisities.

    The Department of Mechanical Engineering actively seeks input on the nature and quality of our program from all interested individuals and organizations, including students, employers and supporting agencies. Our goal is to provide the best possible service to the students who entrust their education to us. Through our continuous improvement efforts, we pledge to continually improve the content of our curriculum, our educational methods and our facilities. Comments to the department head or any member of the faculty are welcomed. Note that, because of this continuous improvement process, degree requirements and course content are subject to periodic change. Please consult the department academic advisor for current information.

Entrance Requirement

    Mechanical Engineering is a restricted major. Students must have a 2.5 or better GPA and complete the required freshman year college of engineering courses to gain admission.

Satisfactory Progress

    University policy requires that students who are making satisfactory progress toward a degree meet minimum criteria toward the Curriculum for Liberal Education (see Academics chapter in this catalog), and toward the degree in mechanical engineering.

    Satisfactory progress toward a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering includes the following minimum criteria:

    1. A minimum overall GPA, of 2.5
    2. An in-major GPA of at least a 2.0 (includes all courses with a « ME » prefix in the course number).

    The department offers graduate programs leading to the M.S., M.Eng., and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering (see the Graduate Catalog).

Semester
First Year
I
II
ENGE 1024: Engineering Exploration
2
ENGE 1114: Engineering Exploration of Design
2
ENGL 1105: Freshman English
3
ENGL 1106: Freshman English
3
CHEM 1035: General Chemistry
3
CHEM 1045: Chemistry Lab
1
MATH 1205: Calculus
3
MATH 1206: Calculus
3
MATH 1114: Elementary Linear Algebra
2
MATH 1224: Vector Geometry
2
PHYS 2305: Foundations of Physics
4
Curriculum for Liberal Education Area 6/2
1
3
Total Required Credits (32 Credit Hours)
15
17
Second Year
I
II
ECE 3054: Electrical Theory
3
ENGE 2314: Engineering Problem Solving with C++
2
ESM 2104, 2204: Statics, Deformable Bodies
3
3
ESM 2304: Dynamics
3
ISE 2214: Manufacturing Processes
1
MATH 2224, 2214: Multivar. Calculus, Diff. Eq.
3
3
ME 2024: Intro to ME Design
3
ME 2124: Intro to Thermal Fluid Sciences
2
STAT 3704: Engineering Statistics
2
PHYS 2306: Foundations of Physics & Lab II
4
Total Required Credits (32 Credit Hours)
16
16
Third Year
I
II
ECE 3254: Industrial Electronics
3
ME 3514: System Dynamics
3
ME 3124: Thermodynamics
3
ME 3304: Heat Transfer
3
ME 3404: Fluid Mechanics
3
ME 3504 or 4504: Vibrations or Controls
3
ME 3614: Mechanical Design
3
ME 4005: ME Lab I
3
MSE 2034: Elements of Materials Science
3
Curriculum for Liberal Education Area 2/3
3
Technical Elective
3
Total Required Credits (33 Credit Hours)
18
15
Fourth Year
I
II
ME 4015, 4016: Capstone Design Course (Writing Intensive)
3
3
ME 4006: ME Lab II (Writing Intensive)
3
ME 4124 CAD of Fluid-Thermal Systems
3
Technical Electives
3
3
Technical Electives
3
3
Curriculum for Liberal Education Area 2/3
3
3
Area 7: Critical Issues in a Global Context
3
Total Required Credits (33 Credit Hours)
18
15
A total of 130 semester credits are required for graduation.

Notes:

  • There are no hidden prerequisites.
  • Foreign Language Requirement: Students who did not complete 2 units of a foreign language in high school must earn 6 credit hours of college level foreign language. These credits are in addition to those normally taken for graduation.

VT-TUD Dual BSME Degree Program

Standard program for students that complete their first three years at Virginia Tech and their senior year at the Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany:

First and Second Year (Virginia Tech) I II
First year: Same as for regular VT BSME degree program
Second year: Same as for regular VT BSME degree program
15
16
17
16
Total Required Credits (64 Credit Hours)
31 33

Third Year and Summer (Virginia Tech) I II III IV
ECE 3254: Industrial Electronics
ME 3514: System Dynamics
ME 3124: Thermodynamics
ME 3304: Heat & Mass Transfer
ME 3404: Fluid Mechanics
ME 3614: Mechanical Design I
ME 4005: Mechanical Engineering Laboratory I
MSE 2034: Elements of Materials Engineering
Curriculum for Liberal Education Area 2 & 7
Curriculum for Liberal Education Area 3
GER 1114: Accelerated Elementary German
GER 2114: Accelerated Intermediate German
3
3
3

3
3


3





3


3
3

6












(6)












6
Total Required Credits (39 Credit Hours)
18 15 6

Fourth Year (Technische Universität Darmstadt) Sep WS SS
German as a Second Language (Course 4) Level B2/C1, Oberkurs, UNIcert III
Strukturdynamik
Systemtheorie und Regelungstechnik
Fluids Engineering Laboratory
Aerodynamik I (3 cr) or Grundlagen der Flugantriebe (4 cr)
Technical Electives
Bachelor-Thesis
Numerische Mathematik
Numerische Berechnungsverfahren
Grundlagen der Turbomaschinen und Fluidsysteme
X










3
3
2
3-4
3-2










6
2
2
4
Total Required Credits (28 Credit Hours)
14 14

The German language courses are only required for those students that do not possess sufficient German language skills: The lectures and exams at Technische Universität Darmstadt (TUD) are in German. The Bachelor Thesis may be written in English. The students must pass the UNIcert Level III exam at TUD in order to enroll in TUD engineering courses.

GER 1114 is equivalent to GER 1105-1106 and satisfies the VT foreign language requirement. GER 2114 is equivalent to GER 2105-2106 and counts in this context as technical elective (2credit hours) and free elective (3 credit hours). Students must earn a “B+” or better in GER 2106 or 2114 to continue at TUD. Students that do not take GER 2105, 2106, 2114, or at least 4 CP ECTS German language courses at TUD as a VT technical elective will need to complete an additional 2 credit hours of technical electives.

TUD requires at least 60 CP ECTS be completed at TUD. The VT BSME degree program requires at least 130 semester credits for graduation.

TUD-VT Dual BSME Degree Program

Standard program for students that complete their first two years at Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany and their senior year and summer at Virginia Tech:

First and Second Year (Technische Universität Darmstadt)
General Chemistry Lab
Arbeitstechniken
Einführung in den Maschinenbau
Grundlagen der Datenverarbeitung
Mathematik I für Maschinenbauer
Naturwissenschaften I
Technische Mechanik I (Statik)
Technologie der Fertigungsverfahren
Einführung in das rechnergestützte Konstruieren
Einführung in die Elektrotechnik
Naturwissenschaften II
Mathematik II für Maschinenbauer
Technische Mechanik II (Elastostatik)
Werkstoffkunde und -prüfung
Naturwissenschaften III
Maschinenelemente und Mechatronik I
Mathematik III für Maschinenbauer
Technische Mechanik III (Dynamik)
Technische Thermodynamik I
Werkstoff- und Bauteilfestigkeit
Technische Strömungslehre
Maschinenelemente und Mechatronik II
Numerische Mathematik
Physikalisches Grundpraktikum für Maschinenbauer
Product Design Project
Technische Thermodynamik II
Messtechnik für Maschinenbauer

Total Required Credits (81 Credit Hours)

Third Year and Summer (Virginia Tech) I II III IV
AOE 4404 or 4024: Applied Numerical Methods or Intro FM
ENGL 1105, 1106: Freshman English I & II
ME 3304: Heat and Mass Transfer
ME 3504: Dynamic Systems – Vibrations
ME 4006: Mechanical Engineering Laboratory II
ME 4015, 4016: Engineering Design and Project I & II
ME 4124: Fluid Machinery – Heat Transfer Design
ME 4504: Dynamic Systems – Controls
Curriculum for Liberal Education Area 2
Curriculum for Liberal Education Area 3
Curriculum for Liberal Education Area 6
Curriculum for Liberal Education Area 7
Technical Electives

3


3
3
3
3

3



3
3
3
3

3




1

3








3


3









3
3



Total Required Credits (49 Credit Hours)
18 19 6 6

The VT BSME degree program requires at least 130 semester credits for graduation.

Undergraduate Courses (ME)

2004 (MATH 2004): ENGINEERING ANALYSIS USING NUMERICAL METHODS
Numerical methods applied to engineering analysis. Linear systems. Root finding. Numerical integration. Ordinary differential equations. Programming using a software package such as Matlab. Pre: ENGE 1016, MATH 1206, MATH 1114. (2H,2C)

2024: INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN AND ECONOMICS
Design process, mini-design projects, collaborative design, product dissection, economics of decision making, reverse engineering, intellectual property, oral, written, and graphic communications, engineering ethics. Pre: ENGE 1016 or ENGE 1114. Co: ESM 2104, PHYS 2306. (3H,3C) I,II.

2124: INTRODUCTION TO THERMAL AND FLUID ENGINEERING
Basics of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer. Fluid and thermal properties of materials. Ideal gas equation of state. First law of thermodynamics in closed systems. Transient heat transfer. First law of thermodynamics in open systems. Fluid mechanics balances, open systems. Emphasis on applications in all topic areas. Pre: ESM 2104. Co: MATH 2214. (2H,2C) I,II,III.

2974: INDEPENDENT STUDY
Variable credit course.

2984: SPECIAL STUDY
Variable credit course.

2994: UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
Variable credit course.

3114: ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS
General treatment of the basic laws of thermodynamics with emphasis on engineering applications. This course is for curricula not requiring 3124.
I Pre: MATH 2214. (3H,3C)

3124: THERMODYNAMICS
Classical thermodynamics and its applications. Thermodynamic properties of pure substances: property tables, property software, equations of state. First law of thermodynamics. Second law of thermodynamics. Gas mixtures. Combustion: atom and energy balances. Power and refrigeration cycles. Pre: 2124, (MATH 2214 or MATH 2214H). (3H,3C) I,II.

3134: FUNDAMENTALS OF THERMODYNAMICS
Fundamental concepts, first and second laws, gas and vapor processes with emphasis on chemical reactions, statistical interpretation of entropy, limited use of thermodynamic property tables. This course is for AOE and ESM students. Pre: MATH 2214 or MATH 2214H. (3H,3C)

3145-3146: FUNDAMENTALS OF NUCLEAR ENGINEERING
Application of fundamental principles of neutron physics and reactor theory. Introduction to nuclear cross-section data, neutron scattering, nuclear fission, and diffusion theory. Examination of current and next generation nuclear power plants. Co: MATH 2214 for 3145. (3H,3C)

3304: HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER
Comprehensive basic course in heat and mass transfer for mechanical engineering students. Principles of conduction, convection, and radiation with applications to heat exchangers and other engineering systems. Pre: 2124, (MATH 2214 or MATH 2214H). (3H,3C) II,IV.

3404: FLUID MECHANICS
Comprehensive first course in basic and applied fluid mechanics. Fluid properties, statics, kinematics, and dynamics. Euler's and Bernoulli's equations. Hydrodynamics. Dimensional analysis and similitude. Real fluids, laminar and turbulent flows. Boundary layer model and approximate analysis. Compressible flow and propulsion devices. Flow measurement. Introduction to turbomachinery with applications. Pre: 2124, (MATH 2214 or MATH 2214H). (3H,3C) I,II.

3504: DYNAMIC SYSTEMS - VIBRATIONS
Principles of dynamic system modeling with emphasis on second order mechanical systems. Harmonic and nonharmonic vibrations of single and multi-degree of freedom systems. Applications of computer simulation and analysis techniques in vibrations. Pre: (MATH 2214 or MATH 2214H), ME 3514. (3H,3C) II,III.

3514: SYSTEM DYNAMICS
Mathematical descriptions of physical systems' behavior including mechanical, electrical, thermal, and fluid systems and their combinations; system descriptions using state variable and transfer functions; analysis of system responses: convolution integral, frequency response, numerical simulations, and Laplace transform methods; systems concepts: input-output, causality, and analogies; general process descriptions including first-order, second-order, and time delayed. Pre: ESM 2304. (3H,3C) I,II.

3604: KINEMATICS AND DYNAMICS OF MACHINERY
Kinematic analysis and design of cams, gears, and linkages, velocity, acceleration and force analysis, kinematic synthesis, balancing, kinematic and force analysis by complex numbers, computer-aided analysis, and synthesis of linkages. Pre: ESM 2304. (3H,3C)

3614: MECHANICAL DESIGN I
Design of mechanical components subject to static and fatigue loads. Design using screws, fasteners, springs and bearings. Computer-aided design using transfer matrix and finite element methods. Pre: ESM 2204, (MATH 2214 or MATH 2214H). (3H,3C) I,II.

4005-4006: MECHANICAL ENGINEERING LAB
Principles of measurement, measurement standards and accuracy, detectors and transducers, digital data acquisition principles, signal conditioning systems and readout devices statistical concepts in measurement, experimental investigation of engineering systems, technical report writing. Pre: ECE 3254, ME 3514, STAT 3704 for 4005; 4005 for 4006. (2H,3L,3C) 4005: II,IV; 4006:

4015-4016: ENGINEERING DESIGN AND PROJECT
Team oriented, open-ended, multi-disciplinary design projects focused on industrially relevant problems. A specific, complex engineering design problem is normally taken from problem definition to product realization and testing. Emphasis is placed on documenting and reporting technical work, idea generation and selection, application of design and analysis tools developed in previous courses, project management, selling technical ideas and working in teams. I Pre: (4005, 3614, 3304), (3504 or 4504) for 4015; 4015 for 4016. 4015: (2H,1L,3C) 4016: (3H,3C)

4124: COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN OF FLUID-THERMAL SYSTEMS
Review of physical laws and engineering concepts introduced in thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer with applications. Emphasis on analysis, modeling, and design of engineering systems, components and physical phenomena with state-of-the-art computer software. Pre: 3124, 3304, 3404. (2H,3L,3C)

4134: AIR CONDITIONING
Analysis and design practice for heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. Psychometrics, air quality, space heating and cooling loads, and moisture control in buildings. Configurations and designs for HVAC systems by conventional practice and computer-aided methods. Liquid- and air-based distribution systems. Selection of HVAC system components including compressors, evaporators, heat pumps, and controls for comfort cooling. Pre: 3304. (3H,3C)

4144: REFRIGERATION AND CRYOGENIC ENGINEERING
Thermodynamics of refrigeration cycles and characteristics of refrigeration equipment. Analysis and design of systems for cold storage, freeze drying, and manufacturing processes. Engineering problems associated with reduction, handling, and storage of cryogenic fluids including liquefied natural gas. Low temperature properties of engineering materials. Pre: 3304. (3H,3C)

4154: INDUSTRIAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT
Comprehensive study of managing energy resources and usage in an industrial plant. Four areas of energy management are covered: how to organize an energy management program in an industrial plant; techniques for conducting industrial energy surveys; how to make energy systems more efficient; and the design and analysis of energy systems. Pre: 3114 or 3124. (3H,3C)

4174 (AOE 4174): SPACECRAFT PROPULSION
Spacecraft propulsion systems and their applications in orbital, interplanetary, and interstellar flight. Rocket propulsion fundamentals; advanced mission analysis; physics and engineering of chemical rockets, electrical thrusters, and propellantless systems (tethers and sails); spacecraft integration issues. Pre: 4234 or AOE 4234. (3H,3C)

4204: INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
Analysis and design of gasoline and diesel engines. Fundamental processes and their application in current technology. Thermodynamics: air standard and air-fuel cycles. Combustion: stoichiometry, fuels, chemical equilibrium, chemical kinetics, flame propagation, knock, pollutant formation and control. Flow processes: volumetric efficiency, intake and exhaust tuning, two-stroke scavenging, carburetion, fuel injection, super- and turbo-charging. Pre: 3124, 3404. (3H,3C)

4214: POWER GENERATION
The design, control, and performance characteristics of electric power generating plants, with major emphasis upon the steam generating system, both fossil and nuclear. Pre: 3124, 3304. Co: 4414. (3H,3C)

4224: AIRCRAFT ENGINES AND GAS TURBINES
Performance and characteristics of aircraft engines and industrial gas turbines, as determined by thermodynamic, fluid mechanic, heat transfer, and solid mechanic behavior of components. Operational limitations and component matching. Stress and associated temperature limits and influence of blade cooling techniques on turbines. Pre: 4234 or 4124. (3H,3C)

4234 (AOE 4234): AEROSPACE PROPULSION SYSTEMS
Design principles and performance analysis of atmospheric and space propulsion engines and systems. Application of thermodynamics, compressible fluid flow and combustion fundamentals to the design of gas turbine and rocket engines and components, including inlets, turbomachines, combustors, and nozzles. Matching of propulsion system to vehicle requirements. Must have a C- or better in pre-requisites ME 3404 and ME 3124 or AOE 3114 and AOE 3134. Pre: (3404, 3124) or (AOE 3114, ME 3134). (3H,3C)

4244 (AOE 4244): MARINE ENGINEERING
Analysis of major ship propulsion devices (propellers, water jets). Integration with propulsion plant and machinery. Characteristics of marine steam turbines, nuclear power plants, marine diesels, and marine gas turbines. Shafting system, bearings, and vibration problems. Must have a C- or better in pre-requisites AOE 3204 and ME 3124 or ME 3134. Pre: AOE 3204, (AOE 3134 or AOE 3124). (3H,3C)

4254: RAMJET AND ROCKET PROPULSION
Detailed study of analysis and design of ramjet and rocket propulsion systems. Vehicle performance requirements relating to choice of propulsion systems. Ramjet inlets, combustion chambers, and nozzles; analysis techniques for high-speed flow. Liquid and solid propellant rocket engine designs. Solid propellant burning rates, grain design. Special propulsion systems for high speed, trans-atmospheric, and space flight. Pre: 4234. (3H,3C)

4304: HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS
Methods for solving multidimensional and transient conduction problems. Convective heat and mass transfer with applications to industrial process heating, heat exchanger design, boiling and condensation, cooling tower design, and aerodynamic heating. Radiation properties of materials and heat transfer applications to real surfaces and absorbing-transmitting media including gases and windows. Transfer from wetted surfaces and through porous media with applications to drying, evaporative cooling, and heat pipe theory. Pre: 3304. (3H,3C)

4404: FLUID MECHANICS II
Integral and differential equations of mass, momentum, and energy. Equations for turbulent flow. Applications in hydrodynamics, thermodynamics of compressible flow, channel and multiple path systems, boundary layers with exact and approximate solutions, shear and drag, fluid transients, laboratory techniques. Pre: 3404. (3H,3C)

4424: THERMODYNAMICS OF FLUID FLOW
One-dimensional compressible flow of perfect gases under specialized conditions: isentropic flow (with area change), normal and oblique shocks, constant area flow with friction, constant area flow with heat transfer, Prandtl-Meyer flow, and generalized one-dimensional flow. Introduction to propulsion systems and other selected topics. Pre: (3124 or 3114), 3404. (3H,3C)

4434 (BSE 4424): FLUID POWER SYSTEMS AND CONTROLS
Design and analysis of industrial and mobile hydraulic systems. Hydrostatic transmissions. Electrohydraulic servovalve characteristics and use in precise position and speed control application. Characteristics of pumps, motors, valves, and activators illustrated in laboratory exercises. Pre: ESM 3024 or ME 3404. (2H,3L,3C)

4444: ROTATING MACHINERY
Techniques and analysis issues associated with the dynamics, operation, and maintenance of rotating machinery with a focus on turbomachinery issues. Vibration analysis, introductory rotor dynamics, rotor balancing techniques, oil and wear particle sampling, gearbox and bearing issues, industrial case studies, and environmental issues associated with power plant operation. Hands-on experience with small high speed rotors and state-of-the-art monitoring instrumentation in common use throughout the petrochemical and power generation industries. Monitoring of actual steam plant equipment. Pre: 3504. (3H,3C)

4504: DYNAMIC SYSTEMS - CONTROLS ENGINEERING I
Fundamentals of feedback control theory, classical analysis and design techniques for automatic controls, introduction to modern control theory.
Pre: 3514. (3H,3C) I,II.

4514: CONTROLS ENGINEERING II
Applications of classical and modern control techniques in design studies. Introduction to nonlinear systems and nonlinear control strategies and to digital control techniques. Includes design problems and case studies with hands-on experience. Pre: 4504. (3H,3C)

4524: INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION
Automation, robot technology, kinematics, dynamics, trajectory planning, and control of two-dimensional and spatial robots; robot programming; design and simulation of robotic devices. Pre: ECE 2574, STAT 4714. (3H,3C)

4534: LAND VEHICLE DYNAMICS
Analytical methods for land vehicle dynamics. Mechanics of pneumatic tires on pavement and steel wheels on rails. Vehicle stability, handling, response to random guideway and roadway irregularities, ride quality computation methods and standards, suspension design. Pre: 3514. (3H,3C)

4544: AUTOMOTIVE ENGINEERING
Vehicle performance, drive train, suspension, steering, and brake systems. Steady state and transient conditions. Senior standing in Mechanical Engineering required. (3H,3C)

4554: ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY FOR MOTOR VEHICLES
Energy use and environmental issues for motor vehicles: Emissions standards, fleet requirements, dynamometer testing, fuel economy, and vehicle performance. Alternative fuel vehicles: Characteristics and infrastructure of fuels, batteries, electric vehicles, and hybrid electric vehicles. Vehicle design: Modeling and simulation of vehicle energy use and performance, component sizing. Fuel cells for transportation. Heavy-duty vehicles and busses. Low mass vehicles and future vehicle technology. Pre: 3114 or 3124 or 3134. (3H,3C)

4604: MECHANISMS
Advanced cam design using analytical and computer methods, design of nonstandard spur-gears cut with a hob and with a pinion-shaper cutter; introduction to computer methods in the design of spur gears; kinematic synthesis by graphical, analytical, and computer methods; balancing of rotating and reciprocating masses, balancing of linkages. Pre: 3604. (3H,3C)

4614: MECHANICAL DESIGN II
Design of mechanical elements such as welded joints hydrodynamic bearings, spur gears, shafts, brakes. Alternative fatigue design methods, cumulative fatigue, mechanical design computer software. Pre: 3614. (3H,3C)

4624: FINITE ELEMENT PRACTICE IN MECHANICAL DESIGN
Application of the finite element method to stress analysis problems in mechanical design. Modeling techniques, proper use of existing computer programs, interpreting of results, application to design modification. Pre: 3614. (3H,3C)

4634: INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN AND MANUFACTURING
Participants will study the computer-aided design and manufacturing of mechanical systems. A mechanical system will be designed including preliminary design, analysis, detail design, numerical control programming, and documentation. Applications programs will be written and interfaced to the CAD/CAM database. All assignments will be carried out on a CAD/CAM system. (2H,3L,3C)

4644: INTRODUCTION TO RAPID PROTOTYPING
Participants will study topics fundamental to rapid prototyping and automated fabrication, including the generation of suitable CAD models, current rapid prototyping fabrication technologies, their underlying material science, the use of secondary processing, and the impact of these technologies on society. The rapid prototyping process will be illustrated by the actual design and fabrication of a part. Programming skills required.
Co: 4634. (3H,3C)

4664: INTRO GLOBAL COLL ENGR DESIGN
Participants will study topics fundamental to global collaborative engineering design, product data management, and collaborative product data management. These topics will be applied during a team project with team members located overseas, utilizing state-of-the-art collaborative engineering and product data management software and hardware technologies. Partially duplicates 5664. Credit may only be received for one course. Pre: 2024, 4634. (3H,3C)

4704 (MSE 4064): TRIBOLOGY
Basic principles of tribology--the study of friction, wear, and lubrication--including the importance of materials, surfaces, design, operating conditions, environment, and lubrication on friction, wear, and surface damage in any system. Application of tribological theories, concepts, techniques, and approaches to design, research, development, evaluation, and problem-solving. Pre: MSE 2034 or MSE 2044, MSE 3034 or ME 3404. (3H,3C)

4714: THEORY AND APPLICATION OF HYDRODYNAMIC LUBRICATION
Basic equation of lubrication as applied to design problems. Reynolds equation, plain journal bearing analysis, fixed arc geometry bearing analysis, tilting pad bearing analysis. Fluid film seal analysis and design. Thrust bearing design and application. Introduction to gas bearing theory. Finite element solution for fluid film bearing analysis. Pre: 3404. (3H,3C)

4724: ENGINEERING ACOUSTICS
Basic acoustical theory and practice, acoustic terminology, measurement, transmission, and perception of sound, muffler design, noise control techniques. Pre: 3404, 3124. (3H,3C)

4734 (ECE 4734): MECHATRONICS
Electromechanical system modeling, control and applications. Design of electronic interfaces and controllers for mechanical devices. Sensor technology, signal acquisition, filtering, and conditioning. Microcontroller-based closed-loop control and device communications. Sensor and actuator selection, installation, and application strategies. I Pre: ECE 2504, ECE 2704 or ME 3514. (3H,3C)

4744: THE COMPLEXITY OF SOCIO-TECHNOLOGICAL PROBLEMS
Examines the complexity and interconnectedness of problems involving technology and society (environmental pollution, waste of natural resources, energy, automation, computers and privacy, medical technology, genetic engineering, hunger, the third world, military spending, nuclear arms and war, etc.). Includes readings, guest lectures, discussion, and project work in small groups on real problems. Junior or Senior standing in any field required. (3H,3C)

4754: IMPACT BIOMECHANICS
Introduction to impact biomechanics. Covers in-depth background of human tolerance to impact loading. Emphasis on the interdisciplinary nature of impact biomechanics. Use of fundamental engineering principles and advanced medical technologies to develop injury prevention measures. Real world examples from automobile safety, military applications, and sport biomechanics. Pre: ESM 2204, ESM 2304. (3H,3C)

4974: INDEPENDENT STUDY
Variable credit course.

4984: SPECIAL STUDY
Variable credit course.

4994: UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
Variable credit course.


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Virginia Tech 2009-2010 Undergraduate Course Catalog and Academic Policies