Welcome to Adobe GoLive 6
Virginia Tech University Registrar

2015-2016 Undergraduate Course Catalog & Academic Policies

Academic Calendars Colleges & Course Descriptions Governance, Administration & Faculty
Academic Policies Financial Information Publication Information
Admissions Information General Information University Academic Advising Center

College of Engineering

Mechanical Engineering

www.me.vt.edu

Danesh K. Tafti, Interim Head and William S. Cross Professor
George R. Goodwin Professor: R. Pitchumani
Samuel P. Langley Professor: C.R. Fuller
W. Martin Johnson Professor: A.J. Kurdila
Chris C. Kraft Professor of Engineering: W. F. Ng
J. Bernard Jones Professor: W.F. O'Brien
Rolls Royce Professor: S. Ekkad
L. S. Randolph Professor: R. G. Parker
Dan Pletta Professor: M. Ahmadian
Professors: M. Ahmadian;  F. Battaglia; R.C. Benson; E.F. Brown; R.A. Burdisso; T.E. Diller; S. Ekkad; C.R. Fuller; T. Furukawa; A. Haghighat;W. Hardy; J.M. Kennedy; A.J. Kurdila; B. Lattimer; R.L. Mahajan; D.J. Nelson; W.F. Ng; W.F. O'Brien; R. Parker; M.R. Paul; R. Pitchumani; S. Priya; C. Sandu; D.K. Tafti; M.R. von Spakovsky
Associate Professors: J. Bayandor; B. Behkam; J.H. Bøhn; J. Cheng; C.L. Dancey; W. Deng; M.W. Ellis; J.B. Ferris; S. Huxtable; M.E.F. Kasarda; K.B. Kochersberger; A.A. Kornhauser; A. Leonessa; R. Mueller; R. Qiao; M.J. Roan; S.C. Southward; S. Taheri; B. Vick; R.L. West; A.L. Wicks; C.B. Williams; L. Zuo
Assistant Professors: A. Asbeck; L. Bickford; C. Hin; Y. Liu; R. Mirzaeifar; A.S. Nain;  P. Tarazaga; Z. Tian
Associate Professor of Practice: M.A. Pierson; L. Vick
Professors Emeritus:  L.J. Arp; R.A. Comparin; N.S. Eiss; R.E. Hedgepeth; C.J. Hurst; J.B. Jones; R.G. Kirk; R.G. Leonard; J. R. Mahan; L.D. Mitchell; R. Mitchiner; J. Moore; A. Myklebust; T.F. Parkinson; F.J. Pierce;
J.R. Thomas; W.C. Thomas; R.J. Whitelaw
Adjunct Professors:  R. Anderl (TU Darmstadt); P.G. Brolinson (Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine); D. Carlson (Lord Corp.); J. Funk (Biodynamic Research Corp.); M.J. Hampe (TU Darmstadt); T. Kress (BEST Engineering); D. Rabe (Air Force Research Lab); B. Sanders (Air Force Research Lab)

mechancial project and students

Nature of the Profession

    Mechanical engineering is the broadest of the engineering professions. Because of the breadth of the ME discipline, mechanical engineers work in a wide variety of technical areas and are employed in a range of job functions. Specialty areas within the mechanical engineering discipline include, among many others, acoustics, biomechanics, CAD, controls, energy conversion and energy management, HVAC, materials, mechanical design, mechatronics, nuclear engineering, robotics and automation, and turbomachinery. The actual job functions which mechanical engineers perform vary widely as well. ME's work in design, research and development, manufacturing, service and maintenance, as well as technical sales, in almost every industry. Many are in management and administration. Many mechanical engineering graduates go on to more advanced degrees, or continue their education in other fields, such a law or business.

Employment Opportunities

    Because of the diversity and breadth of the mechanical engineering profession, ME graduates find employment in a wide variety of industries, laboratories, and consulting firms. This results in a relatively stable job market that is not dependent upon a single particular industry. The textile, petroleum, chemical, electronic, automotive, aerospace, power generation, HVAC, and manufacturing industries hire large numbers of mechanical engineering graduates and the starting salaries for ME's are very competitive with the other engineering disciplines.

    Because of the wide diversity of specialties and job functions any two mechanical engineers might have significantly different day-to-day activities and responsibilities. Some may be concerned with very large engineering systems while others are working with small and even microscale devices and components; some work might call for highly analytical or mathematical approaches while other work might be more amenable to experimental or empirical approaches. Mechanical engineers may be involved in the operation of processing plants, or the design of engines, prosthetic devices, steam and gas turbines or compressors and pumps, alternative fuel devices, and many other devices and systems. At Virginia Tech there is a close association between the ME departments research and design project activities with industry. This enhances the opportunities for student interaction with industry representatives.

Mechanical Engineering Program Educational Objectives

    Within a few years after graduating from the Mechanical Engineering Department at Virginia Tech, the graduates will attain:

    1. Positions where they utilize fundamental technical knowledge and skills in mathematics, science, and engineering to analyze and solve problems, and apply these abilities to generate new knowledge, ideas or products in academia, industry or government.
    2. Practical experience and organizational skills, enabling them to interact and communicate effectively (written and/or oral) with others (e.g., supervisor, client and/or team) with regard to the diversity of the stakeholders involved in their work.
    3. Roles of increasing responsibility leading to leadership positions that  benefit themselves,  their employers and society.
    4. Skills in  life-long learning through: (a) self-study, (b) continuing education/short courses or workshops, and/or (c) formal graduate level education, and encourages co-workers to have this same motivation.
    5. Roles in  professional and personal life where they demonstrate professional and ethical responsibilities toward peers, employers, and society and follow these precepts in their daily lives.

Program Outcomes

    We expect our students to have the following skills, knowledge, and behaviors by the time of their graduation. We want our students to attain:

    • an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
    • an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
    • an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
    • an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams
    • an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
    • an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
    • an ability to communicate effectively
    • the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global  and societal context
    • a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
    • a knowledge of contemporary issues
    • an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

    The Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering (BSME) degree program at Virginia Tech is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

    One important objective of the Department of Mechanical Engineering is to ensure that every mechanical engineering graduate has the knowledge, ability, and understanding required to meet the basic ABET guidelines. The structure and sequence of courses is designed to provide these requirements for every graduate. The department is committed to providing students with an exceptional experience in both the theory and practice of mechanical engineering. In the senior capstone sequence, students are required to apply classroom knowledge to complex engineering problems requiring teamwork, problem formulation, economic analysis, effective communication, and product realization. These projects are carefully selected and updated to ensure relevancy to contemporary technical issues and needs. The department encourages the involvement of underclass students and students outside the department and college in these projects. The department also encourages hands-on student involvement by providing dedicated machine and welding shops that exclusively serve the undergraduate program. The required sophomore-level Manufacturing Processes Laboratory course and certification by a professional machinist are required prior to use of either of these shops. Opportunity for professional development is provided by participation in student professional organizations, such as the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, ASME, and the American Nuclear Society, ANS.

The Curriculum

    A total of 130 semester credits are required for graduation. Please refer to the Registrar’s website for official program checksheets showing the graduation requirements and recommended course plans.  Unofficial documents are available on the ME website showing prerequisite relationships to courses and alternative course plans (e.g. for co-op students and military 4.5 and 5-year plans) http://www.me.vt.edu/academic-programs/undergraduate-program/current-students/course-selection/#requiredcourses.

    The ME curriculum provides a strong foundation in the basic physical and chemical sciences and in mathematics. These are followed by a sequence of courses that provide a broad background in design methodology, computer programming, electronics, solid and fluid mechanics, manufacturing processes, system modeling, machine design, thermodynamics, heat and mass transfer, statistics and materials. Courses in English and in the humanities and social sciences are included to broaden the individual. This background is strengthened and unified through a sequence of engineering design and laboratory courses. Instructional laboratories in the junior and senior years provide opportunities for students to learn measurement and instrumentation techniques. Students apply these skills to the acquisition and analysis of data from various engineering systems.

    In all professional endeavors the mechanical engineer must consider ecological effects as well as the economic and social needs of people. The mechanical engineer must consider the conservation of natural resources and the environmental impact in the design of systems. These considerations are included in a number of ME courses and technical elective classes. Students wishing to further strengthen this area may wish to consider the Green Engineering Option at http://www.eng.vt.edu/green/index.php.

    The unifying activity in all aspects of mechanical engineering is the design function. A special emphasis has been placed on the use of computer-aided design methods and applied design project experience as a required part of the curriculum. Elective courses in the junior and senior years provide students with the opportunity to pursue specialized interests related to career plans or preparation for graduate study.

    The department participates in the Cooperative Education Program in which qualified students may alternate semesters of study with semesters of professional employment. Approximately twenty percent of all mechanical engineering students participate in this program.

    Education Abroad Programs

    The Department of Mechanical Engineering is a world leader in providing high-quality education abroad opportunities to its students and preparing them to function effectively as true global engineers.  The cornerstone of this strategy is the Ultimate Global Engineer Program, which identifies three major windows of opportunity for students to attend topflight mechanical engineering programs abroad and graduate on time.  Students can select to participate in any combination of one, two, or even all three of these windows of opportunity:

    Windows #1:  Fall semester sophomore year in a country where the language of instruction is English.  Currently students can attend the University of Melbourne, the top-ranked mechanical engineering program in Australia.

    Windows #2:  Rising junior summer in a country with a non-English language but where the language of instruction is English.  Currently students can attend Shanghai Jiao Tong University, the top-ranked mechanical engineering program in China.  This program is particularly well suited for students that need to catch up on their course work, reduce their junior-year course load, or get ahead on their course work.

    Windows #3:  Senior year abroad in a country with a non-English language but where the language of instruction is non-English.  Currently students can attend the Technische Universität Darmstadt, the top-ranked mechanical engineering program in Germany.  Language training is integrated into the curriculum, starting as late as spring semester junior year.  Students have the opportunity to simultaneously earn both a VT BSME degree and a TUD BSME degree.

    For more information about these and other exiting education abroad programs offered by the Department of Mechanical Engineering, please visit:
    http://www.me.vt.edu/international
    http://www.tud.vt.edu/BS

Entrance Requirement

    The College of Engineering at Virginia Tech limits the number of students who may transfer into any particular department, with that number based upon the number of faculty in each separate department. Refer to the Engineering Education website (www.enge.vt.edu) for the latest information on transferring into the ME department. The ME academic advisor may also be consulted for information on anticipated entrance requirement changes.

Satisfactory Progress

    University policy requires that students who are making satisfactory progress toward a degree meet minimum criteria toward the Curriculum for Liberal Education (see Academics chapter in this catalog), and toward the degree in mechanical engineering.

    Satisfactory progress toward a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering includes the following minimum criteria:

    1. Complete a minimum of 12 credits that apply toward the BSME each year
    2. maintain an in-major GPA (all ME and NSEG courses) of at least a 2.0
    3. maintain an extended in-major GPA of at least 2.0 (in all ME, NSEG courses plus ESM 2104, 2204, and 2304).
    4. complete ESM 2304, ME 2124, and Math 2214 within 60 attempted required course credits (not to include CLE courses, technical electives, or free electives)
    5. complete ME 3124, ME 3514 and ME 3614 within 72 attempted required course credits (not to include CLE courses, technical electives, or free electives)
    6. complete ME 4006, ME 4015 and ME 4124 within 90 attempted required course credits (not to include CLE courses, technical electives, or free electives)

    The department offers graduate programs leading to the M.S., M.Eng., and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering (see the Graduate Catalog).

The Department of Mechanical Engineering actively seeks input on the nature and quality of our program from all interested individuals and organizations, including students, employers and supporting agencies. Our goal is to provide the best possible service to the students who entrust their education to us. Through our continuous improvement efforts, we pledge to continually improve the content of our curriculum, our educational methods and our facilities. Comments to the department head or any member of the faculty are welcomed. Note that because of this continuous improvement process entrance and degree requirements and course content are subject to change. Please consult the department academic advisor for current information.

Undergraduate Courses (BMES)

2104: INTRODUCTION TO BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING
Methods of mathematical modeling and engineering analyses related to human physiology. Emphasis placed on fundamental concepts such as biomaterials, biomechanics, tissue engineering, biomedical imagining and nanomedicine. Broad spectrum of current biomedical engineering research areas. Pre: (ENGE 1104 or ENGE 1114 or ENGE 1216), PHYS 2305. Co: MATH 2214. (3H,3C)

2984: SPECIAL STUDY
Variable credit course.

4064 (BMVS 4064): INTRO MED PHYSIOLOGY
An introductory to the principles of medical physiology. Designed primarily for (but not limited to), undergraduate students minoring in biomedical engineering, and other related engineering and physical sciences majors with little or no formal background in biological sciences. Basic principles and concepts of human physiology. Special emphasis on the interactions of human systems biology in their entirety rather than individual genes and pathways. Pre: Junior standing or permission of instructor. (3H,3C)

4974: INDEPENDENT STUDY
Variable credit course.

4984: SPECIAL STUDY
Variable credit course.

4994: UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
Variable credit course.

Undergraduate Courses (ME)

2004 (MATH 2004): ENGINEERING ANALYSIS USING NUMERICAL METHODS
Numerical methods applied to engineering analysis. Linear systems. Root finding. Numerical integration. Ordinary differential equations. Programming using a software package such as Matlab. Co: (MATH 1226 or MATH 1206), (MATH 2114 or MATH 1114) Pre: (ENGE 1114 or ENGE 1434 or ENGE 1216). (2H,2C)

2024: INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN AND ECONOMICS
Design process, mini-design projects, collaborative design, product dissection, economics of decision making, reverse engineering, intellectual property, oral, written, and graphic communications, engineering ethics. Pre: (ENGE 1216 or ENGE 1114 or ENGE 1434). Co: ESM 2104, PHYS 2306. (3H,3C) I,II.

2124: INTRODUCTION TO THERMAL AND FLUID ENGINEERING
Basics of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer. Fluid and thermal properties of materials. Ideal gas equation of state. First law of thermodynamics in closed systems. Transient heat transfer. First law of thermodynamics in open systems. Fluid mechanics balances, open systems. Emphasis on applications in all topic areas. Pre: ESM 2104, (MATH 2114 or MATH 2114H). Co: MATH 2214. (2H,2C) I,II,IV.

2974: INDEPENDENT STUDY
Variable credit course.

2974H: INDEPENDENT STUDY
Variable credit course.

2984: SPECIAL STUDY
Variable credit course.

2994: UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
Variable credit course.

2994H: UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
Variable credit course.

3124: THERMODYNAMICS
Classical thermodynamics and its applications. Thermodynamic properties of pure substances: property tables, property software, equations of state. First law of thermodynamics. Second law of thermodynamics. Gas mixtures. Combustion: atom and energy balances. Power and refrigeration cycles. Pre: 2124, (MATH 2214 or MATH 2214H), (MATH 2204 or MATH 2204H or MATH 2224 or MATH 2224H). (3H,3C) I,II.

3134: FUNDAMENTALS OF THERMODYNAMICS
Fundamental concepts, first and second laws, gas and vapor processes with emphasis on chemical reactions, statistical interpretation of entropy, limited use of thermodynamic property tables. This course is for non-ME students. I Pre: MATH 2214 or MATH 2214H. (3H,3C)

3304: HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER
Comprehensive basic course in heat and mass transfer for mechanical engineering students. Principles of conduction, convection, and radiation with applications to heat exchangers and other engineering systems. Pre: 2124, (MATH 2214 or MATH 2214H), (MATH 2204 or MATH 2204H or MATH 2224 or MATH 2224H). (3H,3C) II, III.

3404: FLUID MECHANICS
Comprehensive first course in basic and applied fluid mechanics. Fluid properties, statics, kinematics, and dynamics. Euler's and Bernoulli's equations. Hydrodynamics. Dimensional analysis and similitude. Real fluids, laminar and turbulent flows. Boundary layer model and approximate analysis. Compressible flow and propulsion devices. Flow measurement. Introduction to turbomachinery with applications. Pre: 2124, (MATH 2214 or MATH 2214H), (MATH 2204 or MATH 2204H or MATH 2224 or MATH 2224H). (3H,3C) I,II.

3504: DYNAMIC SYSTEMS - VIBRATIONS
Principles of dynamic system modeling with emphasis on second order mechanical systems. Harmonic and nonharmonic vibrations of single and multi-degree of freedom systems. Applications of computer simulation and analysis techniques in vibrations. Pre: (MATH 2214 or MATH 2214H), ME 3514. (3H,3C) II, IV.

3514: SYSTEM DYNAMICS
Mathematical descriptions of physical systems' behavior including mechanical, electrical, thermal, and fluid systems and their combinations; system descriptions using state variable and transfer functions; analysis of system responses: convolution integral, frequency response, numerical simulations, and Laplace transform methods; systems concepts: input-output, causality, and analogies; general process descriptions including first-order, second-order, and time delayed. Pre: ESM 2304, (MATH 2214 or MATH 2214H), (MATH 2204 or MATH 2204H or MATH 2224 or MATH 2224H). (3H,3C) I, II, III.

3604: KINEMATICS AND DYNAMICS OF MACHINERY
Kinematic analysis and design of cams, gears, and linkages, velocity, acceleration and force analysis, kinematic synthesis, balancing, kinematic and force analysis by complex numbers, computer-aided analysis, and synthesis of linkages. Pre: ESM 2304. (3H,3C)

3614: MECHANICAL DESIGN I
Design of mechanical components subject to static and fatigue loads. Design using screws, fasteners, springs and bearings. Computer-aided design using transfer matrix and finite element methods. Pre: ESM 2204, (MATH 2214 or MATH 2214H), (MATH 2204 or MATH 2204H or MATH 2224 or MATH 2224H). (3H,3C) I,II.

4005-4006: MECHANICAL ENGINEERING LAB
Principles of measurement, measurement standards and accuracy, detectors and transducers, digital data acquisition principles, signal conditioning systems and readout devices statistical concepts in measurement, experimental investigation of engineering systems, technical report writing. Pre: 3514, (ECE 2054 or ECE 3054) or (ECE 2004, ECE 2074), (STAT 3704 or STAT 4604 or STAT 4704 or STAT 4714) for 4005; 4005, ECE 3254 for 4006. Co: ECE 3254 for 4005. (2H,3L,3C) 4005: II,IV; 4006:

4015-4016: ENGINEERING DESIGN AND PROJECT
Team oriented, open-ended, multi-disciplinary design projects focused on industrially relevant problems. A specific, complex engineering design problem is normally taken from problem definition to product realization and testing. Emphasis is placed on documenting and reporting technical work, idea generation and selection, application of design and analysis tools developed in previous courses, project management, selling technical ideas and working in teams. I Pre: (4005, 2024, ECE 3254, ME 3614, ME 3304), (ME 3504 or ME 4504) for 4015; 4015 for 4016. (2H,1L,3C)

4034: BIO-INSPIRED TECHNOLOGY
Introduction to engineering solutions inspired by biological systems. Overview over the approach of bio-inspired technology and the state of the art. Exploration of the relationship between engineered and natural biological systems. Explanation of concepts of biological systems, such as evolutionary optimization, sensing, actuation, control, system integration, assembly and materials in engineering terms. Practice of interdisciplinary analysis skills in technical report writing projects where man-made and biological systems are evaluated for parallels to engineering and their technological potential. Pre: (PHYS 2205, PHYS 2206) or (PHYS 2305, PHYS 2306). (3H,3C)

4124: COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN OF FLUID-THERMAL SYSTEMS
Review of physical laws and engineering concepts introduced in thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer with applications. Emphasis on analysis, modeling, and design of engineering systems, components, and physical phenomena with state-of-the-art computer software such as Ansys CFX, Star CCM, Aspen Plus, and ProSimPlus. Pre: 3124, 3304, 3404. (2H,2L,3C)

4154: INDUSTRIAL ENERGY SYSTEMS
Survey of energy-intensive technologies used in typical industrial plants, with emphasis on cost-effective energy conservation. Burners, boilers, pumps, air compressors, electric motors, lights, refrigeration plants, HVAC systems, cogeneration systems, waste heat recovery equipment. Energy-efficient design and operation. Determination of energy efficiency based on field measurements. Economic analysis of energy conservation measures. Mitigation of environmental impacts. Pre: 3114 or 3124 or 3134 or CHE 2164 or BSE 3154. (3H,3C)

4164: ENERGY SYSTEMS FOR BUILDINGS
Application of the fundamental principles of thermodynamics, heat transfer, and fluid flow to analyze energy use for building environmental control. Exploration of approaches for configuring basic thermal-fluid engineering components (e.g. pumps, piping, fans, heat exchangers, refrigeration cycles, etc.) to yield systems that provide heating, cooling, and ventilation. Introduction to techniques and software tools for estimating energy use by these systems and the associated economic and environment impact. Examination of alternate technologies for meeting building energy needs including small scale combined heat and power systems and renewable energy systems. Pre: 2124, 3124. (3H,3C)

4174 (AOE 4174): SPACECRAFT PROPULSION
Spacecraft propulsion systems and their applications in orbital, interplanetary, and interstellar flight. Rocket propulsion fundamentals; advanced mission analysis; physics and engineering of chemical rockets, electrical thrusters, and propellantless systems (tethers and sails); spacecraft integration issues. Pre: 4234 or AOE 4234. (3H,3C)

4194 (ESM 4194): SUSTAINABLE ENERGY SOLUTIONS FOR A GLOBAL SOCIETY
Addresses energy metrics, global and US energy supply and demand, transitional energy sources (natural gas, petroleum, coal, nuclear), sustainable/renewable source (solar, geothermal, hydro, tidal, wind, biofuels), and methods for increasing efficiencies (energy storage, batteries, green building, conservation). Options for transportation, electricity, lighting and heating needs of industry, agriculture, community, and citizens. Production, transmission, storage, and disposal issues considered in the context of global political, economic, and environmental impacts. Senior Standing in major may be substituted for pre-requisite ENGL 3764. Pre: (CHEM 1035 or CHEM 1055), PHYS 2306, ENGL 3764. (3H,3C)

4204: INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
Analysis and design of gasoline and diesel engines. Fundamental processes and their application in current technology. Thermodynamics: air standard and air-fuel cycles. Combustion: stoichiometry, fuels, chemical equilibrium, chemical kinetics, flame propagation, knock, pollutant formation and control. Flow processes: volumetric efficiency, intake and exhaust tuning, two-stroke scavenging, carburetion, fuel injection, super- and turbo-charging. Pre: 3124, 3404. (3H,3C)

4224: AIRCRAFT ENGINES AND GAS TURBINES
Performance and characteristics of aircraft engines and industrial gas turbines, as determined by thermodynamic, fluid mechanic, heat transfer, and solid mechanic behavior of components. Operational limitations and component matching. Stress and associated temperature limits and influence of blade cooling techniques on turbines. Pre: 4234 or 4124. (3H,3C)

4234 (AOE 4234): AEROSPACE PROPULSION SYSTEMS
Design principles and performance analysis of atmospheric and space propulsion engines and systems. Application of thermodynamics, compressible fluid flow and combustion fundamentals to the design of gas turbine and rocket engines and components, including inlets, turbomachines, combustors, and nozzles. Matching of propulsion system to vehicle requirements. Must have a C- or better in pre-requisites ME 3404 and ME 3124 or AOE 3114 and AOE 3134. Pre: (3404, 3124) or (AOE 3114, ME 3134). (3H,3C)

4244 (AOE 4244): MARINE ENGINEERING
Analysis of major ship propulsion devices (propellers, water jets). Integration with propulsion plant and machinery. Characteristics of marine steam turbines, nuclear power plants, marine diesels, and marine gas turbines. Shafting system, bearings, and vibration problems. Must have a C- or better in pre-requisites AOE 3204 and ME 3124 or ME 3134. Pre: AOE 3204, (AOE 3134 or AOE 3124). (3H,3C)

4324: ENERGY SYSTEMS: THEORY AND APPLICATIONS
Theory and applications of thermodynamic and fluid mechanics principles as applied to energy systems. Fundamental concepts on exergy, mixtures, psychrometry and thermochemistry. Analyses and applications include vapor and gas power systems, refrigeration, air conditioning, combustion processes and one-dimensional compressible flow. Pre: 3124, 3404. (3H,3C)

4344 (CHE 4304): BIOLOGICAL TRANSPORT PHENOMENA
Engineering analysis and predictive modeling of heat and mass transport in biological systems (e.g., tissues, organs, organisms, and biomedical devices). Examination of processes that involve conduction, convection, diffusion, generation/consumption. Application of analytical and computational methods to solve differential equations that describe unsteady and/or multi-dimensional transport. Topics include oxygen transport, pharmacokinetic analysis, kidney function, blood perfusion, burns, and cryopreservation. Pre: (CHE 3114, CHE 3044, CHE 3144) or (ME 3304, ME 3404) or (CHE 3114, CHE 3044, CHE 3144) or (ME 3304, ME 3404). (3H,3C)

4454 (EDCI 4454): ENGINEERING LEADERSHIP IN PRACTICE: MANAGING THE TECHNICAL DESIGN PROCESS
Introduction to management and mentoring skills associated with the application of the engineering design process. Course covers skills necessary for leading diverse teams of people through a technical design project. Managing teams of local high school students through an authentic technical design experience associated with design competitions. Course addresses the practical applications of science, math and engineering, while building and managing teams of people to meet technical project goals. Pre-requisite: ME 4015 or similar team-based design experience, or by permission of instructor. Pre: 4015. (2H,3L,3C)

4504: DYNAMIC SYSTEMS - CONTROLS ENGINEERING I
Fundamentals of feedback control theory, classical analysis and design techniques for automatic controls, introduction to modern control theory. Pre: 3514, (MATH 2214 or MATH 2214H). (3H,3C) I,II.

4524: INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION
Automation, robot technology, kinematics, dynamics, trajectory planning, and control of two-dimensional and spatial robots; robot programming; design and simulation of robotic devices. II Pre: (ECE 2574, STAT 4714) or (ME 3514, STAT 3704). (3H,3C)

4534: LAND VEHICLE DYNAMICS
Analytical methods for land vehicle dynamics. Mechanics of pneumatic tires on pavement and steel wheels on rails. Vehicle stability, handling, response to random guideway and roadway irregularities, ride quality computation methods and standards, suspension design. II Pre: 3514. (3H,3C)

4544: AUTOMOTIVE ENGINEERING
Vehicle performance, drive train, suspension, steering, and brake systems. Steady state and transient conditions. Senior standing in Mechanical Engineering required. I (3H,3C)

4554: ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY FOR MOTOR VEHICLES
Energy use and environmental issues for motor vehicles: Emissions standards, fleet requirements, dynamometer testing, fuel economy, and vehicle performance. Alternative fuel vehicles: Characteristics and infrastructure of fuels, batteries, electric vehicles, and hybrid electric vehicles. Vehicle design: Modeling and simulation of vehicle energy use and performance, component sizing. Fuel cells for transportation. Heavy-duty vehicles and busses. Low mass vehicles and future vehicle technology. I Pre: 3114 or 3124 or 3134. (3H,3C)

4614: MECHANICAL DESIGN II
Design of mechanical elements such as welded joints hydrodynamic bearings, spur gears, shafts, brakes. Alternative fatigue design methods, cumulative fatigue, mechanical design computer software. Pre: 3614. (3H,3C)

4624: FINITE ELEMENT PRACTICE IN MECHANICAL DESIGN
Application of the finite element method to stress analysis problems in mechanical design. Modeling techniques, proper use of existing computer programs, interpreting of results, application to design modification. I Pre: 3614. (3H,3C)

4634: INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN AND MANUFACTURING
Participants will study the computer-aided design and manufacturing of mechanical systems. A mechanical system will be designed including preliminary design, analysis, detail design, numerical control programming, and documentation. Applications programs will be written and interfaced to the CAD/CAM database. All assignments will be carried out on a CAD/CAM system. II (2H,3L,3C)

4644: INTRODUCTION TO RAPID PROTOTYPING
Participants will study topics fundamental to rapid prototyping and automated fabrication, including the generation of suitable CAD models, current rapid prototyping fabrication technologies, their underlying material science, the use of secondary processing, and the impact of these technologies on society. The rapid prototyping process will be illustrated by the actual design and fabrication of a part. Programming skills required. (3H,3C)

4664: INTRO GLOBAL COLL ENGR DESIGN
Participants will study topics fundamental to global collaborative engineering design, product data management, and collaborative product data management. These topics will be applied during a team project with team members located overseas, utilizing state-of-the-art collaborative engineering and product data management software and hardware technologies. Partially duplicates 5664. Credit may only be received for one course. I Pre: 2024, 4634. (3H,3C)

4724: ENGINEERING ACOUSTICS
Basic acoustical theory and practice, acoustic terminology, measurement, transmission, and perception of sound, muffler design, noise control techniques. I Pre: 3514. (3H,3C)

4735,4736: MECHATRONICS
Electromechanical system modeling, control and applications. Design and building of electronic interfaces and controllers for mechanical devices, sensors, signal acquisition, filtering, and conditioning. Microcontroller-based closed-loop control and device communications. Sensor and actuator selection, installation, and application strategies are studied. A term design project is a key component to this course (for 4736). Pre: (ECE 3254, ME 3514) or (ECE 2004, ECE 2704) for 4735; 4735 for 4736. (3H,3C)

4864: MICRO/NANO-ROBOTICS
Overview of Micro/Nano-robotic systems. Physics of reduced length scales (scaling effects in the physical parameters, surface forces, contact mechanics, and Micro/Nano-scale dynamical phenomena), Basics of Micro/Nano-manufacturing, microfabrication and soft lithography, Biomimetic design strategies for mobile micro-robots, Principle of transduction, material properties and characteristics of Micro/Nano-actuators (piezoelectric, shape-memory alloy, and a variety of MEMS and polymer actuators), Control requirements and challenges of Micro/Nano-actuators, Micro/Nano sensors for mobile microrobotic applications, Micro/Nano-manipulation (scanning probe microscopy, operation principles, designing experiments for nanoscale mechanical characterization of desired samples). Pre: MATH 2214, ME 3404, ME 3514. (3H,3C)

4974: INDEPENDENT STUDY
Variable credit course.

4974H: INDEPENDENT STUDY
Honors
Variable credit course.

4984: SPECIAL STUDY
Variable credit course.

4994: UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
Variable credit course.

4994H: UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
Variable credit course.

Undergraduate Courses (NSEG)

3145-3146: FUNDAMENTALS OF NUCLEAR ENGR
Application of fundamental principles of neutron physics and reactor theory. Introduction to nuclear cross-section data, neutron scattering, nuclear fission, and diffusion theory. Examination of current and next generation nuclear power. Pre: MATH 2214 or MATH 2215H for 3145; 3145 or ME 3145 for 3146. (3H,3C)

3604: RADIATION DETECTION, PROTECTION AND SHIELDING
Radioactive decay, interaction of charged particles and photons with matter, methods of radiation detection and radiation dosimetry, counting statistics, radiation protection criteria and exposure limits, external radiation protection using time, distance and shielding. Pre: PHYS 2306. Co: MATH 2214. (3H,3C)

4974: INDEPENDENT STUDY
Variable credit course.

4984: SPECIAL STUDY
Variable credit course.

4994: UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
Variable credit course.

4994H: UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
Honors Section
Variable credit course.

TOP

Search Catalog
Virginia Tech 2015-2016 Undergraduate Course Catalog and Academic Policies