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2013-2014 Undergraduate Course Catalog & Academic Policies

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College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences

Human Development

HD student with childrenwww.humandevelopment.vt.edu/
E-mail: hdd@vt.edu

Anisa Zvonkovic, Department Head
Alumni Distinguished Professor:
R. Blieszner
Professors: K. R. Allen; J. Arditti; M. Boucouvalas; V. R. Fu; E. E. McCollum;
P. S. Meszaros; F. P. Piercy; K. A. Roberto; A. Zvonkovic
Associate Professors: M. J. Benson; M. L. Dolbin-MacNab; A. L. Few-Demo;
A. J. Huebner; S. E. Jarrott; C. Kaestle; K.J. Kim; S. W. Johnson; C. L. Smith
Assistant Professors: M. Falconier; E. Grafsky; M. L. Keeling; J. Savla; A. Wittenborn Senior Instructor: M.E. Verdu
Instructor:K. Gallagher; I. Schepisi
Adjunct Faculty: M. Komelski


Overview

    The Department of Human Development offers undergraduate study of family relationships and of human development across the lifespan. The department's mission is to understand and improve the lives of people of all ages in relationships, families, organizations, and communities. The Human Services option leading to the B.S. prepares students for a variety of professional careers.

    The program participates in the University Honors Program.

    The department offers graduate programs leading to the M.S. in applied human development at the Blacksburg campus, and adult learning and human resource development as well as marriage and family therapy at the National Capital Region campus. The department also offers graduate programs leading to the Ph.D. in adult development and aging, adult learning and human resource development, child and adolescent development, family studies, and marriage and family therapy. Graduate students can earn the Graduate Certificate in Gerontology along with their degree or as Commonwealth Campus students (for more information, contact the Center for Gerontology, 237 Wallace Hall, 540/231-7657). (See Graduate Catalog)

Human Services

    Career Advisors: M. E. Verdu
    The Human Services Option is for students interested in a wide variety of careers and graduate school programs. The option provides undergraduate majors with a theoretical and experiential grounding in child and adult development and in family and relational dynamics. Course work includes emphases on how individuals and families develop over the life cycle, on the critical issues and events that influence families, and on family transitions and dynamics. The curriculum also focuses on human sexuality, family diversity, and social and public policies that affect individuals and their families. Through course work and field placement experiences, human services students develop and practice skills and communcation techniques for working with individuals, families and groups. In addition to course work with the Department of Human Development, human services students take courses in the areas of psychology, sociology, biology, statistics and mathematics, writing and communication, family economics, creative arts, cultural traditions, and international perspectives on human concerns. Students may tailor their studies to their particular professional goals and interests through the use of free electives.

    The field study, which integrates theory, research and practice, is a pivotal experience in students' career development. It increases students' communication and practice skills and helps narrow career interests. Careers open to human services graduates include: preschool, elementary, family & consumer science and special education, employment and job training services, health and wellness programs, housing services, income programs, mental health services, nutrition and meals programs, protective services, recreation programs, respite services, social services, substance abuse programs, volunteer programs, and child care services. Graduate and professional options that human services graduates may consider include business, community health and public health, law, education, family studies, gerontology, marriage and family therapy, medicine and nursing, psychology and sociology, public administration, rehabilitation, and social work.

A. Required (55 credits) for students graduating in 2012 in tracks: Child & Adolescent, Family Gerontology or Professional Helping Skills
COMM 2004: Public Speaking 3
HD 1004: Human Development I: Childhood and Adolescence 3
HD 2004: Human Development II: Adulthood and Aging 3
HD 2335-2336: Principles of Human Services 3-3
HD 2304: Family Relationships 3
HD 2314: Human Sexuality 3
HD 3014: Research Methods in H.D. 3
HD 4324: Individual & Family Risk & Resilience
3
HD 4354: The Family, Law, and Public Policy 3
HD 4364: Gender and Family Diversity 3
HD 4714: Senior Capstone 3
HD 4964: Field Study 6
AHRM 2304: Family Financial Management
or AHRM 2404: Consumer Rights
3
STAT 3604: Statistics for the Social Sciences 3
LAHS 3004: Professional Seminar 1
B. Tracks: select one: Child & Adolescent; Family Gerontology; Professional Helping Skills (9-12 credits)
Students are encouraged to consider the wide array of courses across the university curriculum as potential choices for electives to support their Human Services major. In consultation with the major advisor, each student should confirm that prerequisite requirements have been met before enrolling in elective courses. Courses used in Section A cannot be counted again in Section B.
C. Free Electives (Select 23-28 credits)
Students are encouraged to consider the wide array of courses across the university curriculum as potential choices for electives to support their Human Services major. In consultation with the major advisor, each student should confirm that prerequisite requirements have been met before enrolling in elective courses. Courses used in Section A cannot be counted again in Section B.
Total Credits
120

Note: Please consult the appropriate catalog course list or the departmental checksheet for prerequisites to required courses.

Satisfactory Progress

    A student will be considered to have made satisfactory progress toward the degree when he/she has successfully completed the Curriculum for Liberal Education requirements for English, mathematics, and biology, and HD 1004, by the time the student has attempted 72 semester credits.

Course Descriptions (HD)

1004: HUMAN DEVELOPMENT I: CHILDHOOD AND ADOLESCENCE
Basic concepts related to normal human development. Emphasis on developmental theories and principles of growth, development, and behavior of children from conception through adolescence.  Designed as a general survey course for majors and non-majors. (3H,3C) I,II.

2004: HUMAN DEVELOPMENT II:  ADULTHOOD AND AGING
Introduction to adult development and aging (gerontology). Basic concepts, principles, and issues of development across the adult years. Pre: 1004. (3H,3C)

2304: FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS
Overview of basic concepts, principles, theories, and issues of development and change in family relationships.  Topics include families in historical and contextual perspective, structural and relational diversity in families, and processes of relational development, maintenance, and dissolution in families. (3H,3C)

2314: HUMAN SEXUALITY
Explores the diversity of human sexuality using global perspectives.  Biological, historical, developmental, psychological, and sociological approaches frame this interdisciplinary examination of the social constructions of sexuality, the processes of gender stratification, and the development of sexual practices, rituals, mythologies, and belief systems across time and around the world. (3H,3C)

2335-2336: PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN SERVICES
2335: Basic concepts, techniques, and structure of the human services profession.  Survey of client/family assessment and problem management.  2336: Advanced topics in human services focusing on: case management, crisis intervention, program administration, specialized interventions, ethics, and professional development. Pre: 1004 for 2335; 2335 for 2336. (3H,3C)

2964: FIELD STUDY
Pass/Fail only. Variable credit course.

2974: INDEPENDENT STUDY
Variable credit course.

2974H: INDEPENDENT STUDY
Variable credit course.

2984: SPECIAL STUDY
Variable credit course. X-grade allowed.

3014: RESEARCH METHODS IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
Critical thinking and  problem-solving involved in applying methods of scientific inquiry to the field of human development. Topics include methods of data collection, basic methods for displaying and analyzing data, and writing reports. Pre: 2004, 2304, STAT 3604. (2H,1L,3C)

3114: ISSUES IN AGING
Seminar which investigates selected contemporary issues in adulthood and old age, such as family and friend relationships; work and retirement; political, legal, and economic issues; and women's concerns. (3H,3C) I,II.

3144 (EDCI 3144): EDUCATION OF EXCEPTIONAL LEARNERS
Emphasizes legal, ethical, and economic bases, assessment and eligibility requirements, characteristics and educational implications, and practices pertaining to various exceptionalities. (3H,3C)

3214: INFANCY AND EARLY CHILDHOOD
Theories, principles, normal patterns of physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development from conception to the early school years.  Micro and macro environmental influences on development are considered as they interact with genetic/biological determinants of development. Pre: 1004. (3H,3C)

3224: MIDDLE CHILDHOOD AND ADOLESCENCE
Theories, principles, normal patterns of physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development from middle childhood to adolescence.  Micro and macro environmental influences on development are considered as they interact with genetic/biological determinants of development. Pre: 1004. (3H,3C)

3234: LIFESPAN COMMUNITY SERVICES
Health and human service programs serving children, youth, older, adults, and families.  Overview of community programs for individuals and families over the lifespan; methods of determining service eligibility; procedures for maintaining quality assurance. Pre: 1004, 2304, 2004. (3H,3C)

3304: ADVANCED HELPING SKILLS
Helping skills used in human services settings. Case management, evaluating crisis situations, and approaches to individual and family assessment. Pre: 2335, 2336. (3H,3C)

3334: INDIVIDUAL AND FAMILY INTERVENTIONS
Focus on intervention approaches used in human services settings.  Provides students with an introduction to theories of individual, couple, family, and group intervention.  Students will apply course material to case scenarios.  Topics include theories of intervention, developmentally appropriate interventions, and methods for addressing diversity.  Students will be introduced to intervention strategies used in a variety of human services settings. Students with Graduate standing are not required to take the pre-requisite HD 2004. Pre: 3304. (3H,3C)

3464 (AHRM 3464) (APS 3464) (EDHL 3464) (GEOG 3464) (HUM 3464) (SOC 3464) (UAP 3464): APPALACHIAN COMMUNITIES
The concept of community in Appalachia using an interdisciplinary approach and experiential learning. Interrelationships among geographically, culturally, and socially constituted communities, public policy, and human development. Pre: Junior standing. (3H,3C)

3954: STUDY ABROAD
Variable credit course.

4114: COMMUNITY BASED SERVICES FOR OLDER ADULTS
Introduces students to the health and human services programs that comprise the community-based long term care system.  Topics include an overview of the continuum of community programs and services for older adults, methods to determine service eligibility, and procedures for maintaining quality assurance.  Prerequisite or graduate standing is required. Pre: 2004. (3H,3C)

4304: HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATION
Issues, functions, and responsibilities involved in developing, implementing, and evaluating family and human services programs. Pre: 3234 or 4114. (3H,3C)

4324: INDIVIDUAL AND FAMILY RISK AND RESILIENCE
Investigation of challenges, stresses, and crises experienced by individuals and families; protective factors and resilience; coping strategies; prevention and intervention. Pre: 2304. (3H,3C)

4334: PERSPECTIVES ON ADDICTION AND FAMILY SYSTEMS
Intra-personal and inter-personal dimensions of compulsive- addictive patterns manifested in the context of the family system.  Reciprocal interaction between families and other systems.  Junior standing required. Pre: 2304 or 2314. (3H,3C) I,II.

4354: FAMILY, LAW, AND PUBLIC POLICY
Theoretical and substantive issues that relate to the development and implementation of family policies. Implications of political culture and family legislation for the well-being of children and their families. Pre: 1004, 2335, 2336, 2004, 2304. (3H,3C) I,II.

4364: GENDER AND FAMILY DIVERSITY
Examination of the changing character of individual and family diversity, as related to the intersections among gender, race, class, sexuality, age, and ability. Junior standing required Pre: 2304. (3H,3C) I,II.

4374: PARENT EDUCATION AND PRACTICE
Students review concepts, principles, program trends, and research related to parent education using a life course approach.  Students examine parenting diversity including parents of different social addresses and parents with chronically ill, mentally and physically challenged, or gifted children. Pre: 1004, 2004, 2304, 4324. (3H,3C)

4714: SENIOR CAPSTONE SEMINAR
Intensive learning experiences in critical thinking and analysis. Opportunities to demonstrate breadth of learning while developing leadership skills and honing professional competencies.  Topics include leadership and team development, problem solving, grant writing, program evaluation, and electronic portfolios. Senior standing in Human Services required. (3H,3C)

4964: FIELD STUDY
Variable credit course.
Pre: 1004, 2004, 2335, 2336.

4974: INDEPENDENT STUDY
Variable credit course.

4974H: INDEPENDENT STUDY
Variable credit course.

4984: SPECIAL STUDY
Variable credit course.

4994: UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
Variable credit course.

4994H: UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
Variable credit course.

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Virginia Tech 2013-2014 Undergraduate Course Catalog and Academic Policies