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2013-2014 Undergraduate Course Catalog & Academic Policies

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Liberal Arts and Human Sciences

English

www.english.vt.edu

English Dept. 2003Joseph F. Eska, Chair
Anthony J. Colaianne, Associate Chair
Suzanne Reisinger, Assistant Chair

University Distinguished Professor: N. Giovanni
Alumni Distinguished Professors: T. M. Gardner; L. H. Roy
NationsBank Clifford A. Cutchins III Professor: P. Sorrentino
Professors: L. M. Anderson; F. D’Aguiar; J. F. Eska; E. Falco; V. Fowler;
D. George; P. W. Graham; B. Hausman; N. A. Metz; D. W. Mosser;
F. Oehlschlaeger; D. H. Radcliffe; R. W. Siegle
Associate Professors: K. Belanger; W. G. Campbell; S. Carter-Tod;
G. Chandler; A. J. Colaianne; J. Dubinsky; C. Evia; S. Fowler; P. Heilker;
R. Hicok; S. M. Knapp; J. Mann; E. Meitner; K. Pender; K. M. Powell; S. Salaita;
K. Swenson
Assistant Professors: C. M. Eska; E. Mazzolini; J. M. Vollmer; Q. Warnick
Senior Instructors: M. Armstrong; M. Bliss; E. Bloomer; R. Canter; K. Graham; J. Harvill; S. Kark;  A. F. Kinder; J. Lawrence; J. Mooney; S. Mooney; M. D. Moore; A. Murphy; L. Neilan; H. R. Patton; S. Reisinger; S. Saffle; L. Skinner; M. S. Smith;  G. Voros; J. Wemhoener
Advanced Instructors: R. Allnutt; Z. K. Combiths; S. Frost; J. Mengert; S. Oakey; V. Ruccolo; J. Scallorns
Instructors: J. Barton; C. Bean; S. Conaway; S. Crickenberger; J. A. Gibbs; E. A. Lautenschlager; V. LeCorre; S. Martin; M. Maycock;
S. Sanders
Visiting Assistant Professor: K. Cleland
Coordinator of Undergraduate Advising:  K. Graham (231-6212)


Overview

    The curriculum in English offers excellent preparation for students who seek careers in business, government, and non-profit organizations, who are preparing for graduate or professional schools, who plan to teach, and who are seeking careers that involve writing.

The English Major

    The major in English is composed of an in-major core of 24 hours and a number of upper-division options ranging from 27 to 33 hours (including 3-15 hours of English electives).

    After completion of the in-major core, the English major offers three options for specialization: Literature, Language, and Culture; Professional Writing; and Creative Writing. Students who choose the Literature, Language, and Culture option will select one of the following tracks: Literature, Pre-Education, or Pre-Law.

The In-Major Core:
All English majors must take 24 hours distributed as follows.
    • 5 hours: Foundational Work. Introduction to Critical Reading (2604) and The English Studies ePortfolio (2614). The two courses, the gateway course to the major and its co-requisite course, should be taken in the same semester immediately after satisfaction of the first-year writing requirement.
    • 12 hours: Literary Traditions. Survey of British Literature (2515, 2516), Shakespeare (4165 or 4166), and Survey of American Literature (2525 or 2526).
    • 3 hours: Global Literacy. Study Abroad (3954), Literature and Ecology (3534), Postcolonial Cultural Studies (3644), or Intercultural Issues in Professional Writing (3834).
    • 4 hours: Capstone Experience. Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction (4704); Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry (4714); Senior Seminar (4784); or Issues in Professional and Public Discourse (4874); and Senior Portfolio Development in Creative Writing (4734); Senior Portfolio Development in Literature, Language, and Culture (4774); or Senior Portfolio Development in Professional Writing (4864).
    • 1 hours: Senior e-Portfolio Course. Creative Writing (4734); Literature, Language, and Culture (4774); Professional Writing (4864).

Upper-Division Options

    In order to enroll in an upper-division option, a student must:

    • Pass 2604 with a minimum grade of C.
    • Complete 12 of the 24 hours in the in-major core with a GPA of 2.0 or better.

Literature, Language, and Culture Option

    The Literature, Language, and Culture (LLC) Option of the major is aimed at those students who are interested in the study of literature and language and their many contexts and who want to pursue careers in such areas as the law, business, government, publishing, advertising, social services, and education. There are three different tracks in the LLC Option: the Literature Track, the Pre-Education Track, and the Pre-Law Track.

    We have known for centuries that the study of literature, language, and culture is matchless in preparing students for a lifetime of reading, analysis, self-discovery, and self-expression. Each of the three LLC choices grounds students in the sophisticated thought and analysis of literary studies, then focuses them upon a track that will take them more deeply into literary studies or into the specific preparations for careers in education or law. In addition to the in-major core requirements (24 hours), each track has its own unique emphasis and requirements.

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The Literature Track

    This choice allows students the maximum of time devoted to the various periods, genres, themes, major figures, and practices distinctive to region, ethnicity, or gender; students will not only finish their degrees with a rich sense of the best that has been thought and said, but they will also be skilled in the art of analyzing any text or body of data and in presenting their analyses persuasively and insightfully.

    The B.A. in English, LLC Option/Literature Track, requires 28 hours in English beyond the in-major core; these 28 hours are distributed as following: to fulfill the period or author requirements detailed below, the student must take one of the following courses which cover pre-1800 literature: 3204, 3214, 3224, 4114, 4124, 4214, 4554, or an appropriate section of 3254:

    • 3 hours: A backgrounds course chosen from the following: Ancient Greek & Roman Mythology (CLA 2444); Literary and Cultural Criticism (3354); The Bible As Literature (3584); Hebrew Bible/Old Testament (REL 2414); New Testament (REL 2424).
    • 3 hours: A period course chosen from the following: Medieval Literature (3204); Renaissance Literature (3214); Augustan Literature (3224); Romantic Literature (3234); Victorian Literature (3244); American Literature before 1900 (3254); Modernist British Literature (3264); Modernist American Literature (3274); Introduction to Old English (4124).
    • 3 hours: An author course chosen from the following: Chaucer (4114); Shakespeare I (4165); Shakespeare II (4166); Milton (4214); Studies in a British Author after 1800 (4624); Studies in an American Author before 1900 (4634); Studies in an American Author after 1900 (4644). The Shakespeare course taken for the in-major core cannot also satisfy the author requirement.
    • 3 hours: A course in prose narrative chosen from the following: English Novel I (4405); English Novel II (4406); American Narrative to 1950, I (4415); American Narrative to 1950, II (4416); Contemporary Fiction (4664).
    • 3 hours: A course in non-canonical literature chosen from the following: Topics in Literature by Women (3364); Literature for Children (3524); Ethnic Literature for Children (3514); African-American Literature (3634); Ethnic American Literature (3654).
    • 1 hour: A Career Planning Course: Professional Seminar (LAHS 3004)
    • 12 hours: Four English elective courses; at least six hours must be at the 4000-level, and no more than three hours can be below the 3000-level.
    • Other Requirement: Completion of the ePortfolio.

    For more information, please consult the LLC web pages (http://www.english.vt.edu/undergraduate/LLC).

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The Pre-Education Track

    This track will provide students with a thorough grounding in canonical American and British literature and hone their skills in literary analysis, but it will also ensure that they become conversant with content areas required by the Virginia state licensing board: literature written by minorities and women, linguistics, and world literature. Pursuit of this track is the best possible way to prepare for the graduate work leading to certification.

    The B.A. in English, LLC Option/Pre-Education Track, requires 30 hours in English beyond the in-major core. Those 30 hours are distributed as follows:

    • 3 hours: A period or author course chosen from among the following: Medieval Literature (3204); Renaissance Literature (3214); Augustan Literature (3224); Romantic Literature (3234); Victorian Literature (3244); American Literature before 1900 (3254); Modernist British Literature (3264); Modernist American Literature (3274); Introduction to Old English (4124); British Drama Before 1800 (4554); Chaucer (4114); Shakespeare I (4165); Shakespeare II (4166); Milton (4214); Studies in a British Author after 1800 (4624); Studies in an American Author before 1900 (4634); Studies in an American Author after 1900 (4644). The Shakespeare course taken for the in-major core cannot also satisfy this requirement.
    • 3 hours: A 3000–4000-level course in women's literature chosen from among the following: Topics in Literature by Women (3364); an appropriate section of British Author after 1800 (4624); an appropriate section of American Author before 1900 (4634); an appropriate section of American Author after 1900 (4644)
    • 3 hours: A 3000-4000 level course in literature by a minority chosen from among the following: African-American Literature (3634); Ethnic Literature for Children (3514); Ethnic American Literature (3654); an appropriate section of British Author after 1800 (4624); an appropriate section of American Author before 1900 (4634); an appropriate section of American Author after 1900 (4644)
    • 3 hours: A 3000 or 4000-level writing course chosen from among the following: Introduction to Professional Writing (3104); Advanced Composition (3754); Technical Writing (3764); Business Writing (3774); Science Writing (4824)
    • 12 hours: Contemporary Approaches to Linguistics (4065-4066), Language and Society (4044), and History of the English Language (4054), English Syntax (4074) or Working Grammar (3314)
    • 6 hours: Two English elective courses at the 4000 level.
    • Other Requirement: Completion of the ePortfolio

    In addition to these specific course requirements, LLC/Pre-Education majors who plan careers in elementary or middle school education should consider using their electives to take the following courses: Introduction to World Literature (1644); Literature for Children (3524) and English Syntax (4074).

    For more information, please consult the LLC web pages (http://www.english.vt.edu/undergraduate/LLC).

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The Pre-Law Track

    This choice is the ideal preparation for the study and practice of the field of law; students will finish their degree with significant advantages as readers and analysts of the law archives that they must master in their graduate training, and also as masters of the art of presentation in the briefs and oral presentations that constitute the bulk of a legal career.

    The B.A. in English, LLC Option/Pre-Law Track, requires 28 hours in English beyond the in-major core. The 28 hours are distributed as follows:

    • 3 hours: A period course chosen from the following: Introduction to Old English (4124); Medieval Literature (3204); Renaissance Literature (3214); British Drama Before 1800 (4554); Augustan Literature (3224); Romantic Literature (3234); Victorian Literature (3244); American Literature before 1900 (3254); Modernist British Literature (3264); Modernist American Literature (3274).
    • 3 hours: Literature and the Law (3684)
    • 3 hours: A 3000–4000 level writing course chosen from among the following: Professional Writing (3104); Advanced Composition (3754); Technical Writing (3764); Business Writing (3774); Science Writing (4824)
    • 3 hours: An author course chosen from the following: Chaucer (4114); Shakespeare I (4165); Shakespeare II (4166); Milton (4214); British Author after 1800 (4624); American Author before 1900 (4634); American Author after 1900 (4644). The Shakespeare course taken for the in-major core cannot also satisfy the author requirement.
    • 3 hours: A course in prose narrative chosen from the following: English Novel I (4405); English Novel II (4406); American Narrative to 1950, I (4415); American Narrative to 1950, II (4416); Contemporary Fiction (4664)
    • 3 hours: A course in non-canonical literature chosen from the following: Topics in Literature by Women (3364); Ethnic Literature for Children (3514); Literature for Children (3524); African-American Literature (3634); Postcolonial Cultural Studies (3644); Ethnic American Literature (3654). Postcolonial Cultural Studies cannot be taken to satisfy this requirement if taken to satisfy the Global Literacy Requirement in the in-major core.
    • 1 hour: A Career Planning Course: Professional Seminar (LAHS 3004)
    • 9 hours: Three English elective courses; at least six hours must be at the 4000 level, and no more than three hours can be below the 3000 level.
    • Other Requirement:  Completion of the ePortfolio.
For more information, please consult the LLC web pages (http://www.english.vt.edu/undergraduate/LLC)

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Professional Writing Option

    The Professional Writing (PW) Option of the major is aimed at those students who want to make writing a career. Students combine coursework on the methods, forms, technologies, and issues of workplace writing with practical experience, usually in the form of client or service-learning projects with non-profit organizations. As a result, students begin their careers with the writing skills needed to succeed in today's competitive market, an understanding of professional expectations, experience with current software packages, and a portfolio of real-world writing samples.

    The B.A. in English, PW Option, requires 50 hours. The 27 hours in English beyond the in-major core are distributed as follows:

    • 3 hours: Professional Writing (3104).
    • 3 hours: Technical Editing and Style (3804).
    • 3 hours: A course in linguistics chosen from the following: Working English Grammar (3314); Language and Society (4044); History of the English Language (4054); English Syntax (4074)
    • 12 hours: At least 6 hours at 4000-level:  Professional Writing electives chosen from the following: Creating User Documentation (3814); Designing Documents for Print (3824); Intercultural Issues in Professional Writing (3834); Writing and Digital Media (3844); Grant Proposals and Reports (4804); Developing On-line Content (4814); Science Writing (4824); Internship [Professional Writing Focus] (4964).  ENGL 3104 and 3804 are pre-requisites for all PW electives except 4824, Science Writing.
    • 6 hours: Two English elective courses from 3000-4000 level courses.
    • Other Requirement: Completion of the ePortfolio.

For more information, please consult the Professional Writing web pages (http://www.english.vt.edu/undergraduate/PW/).

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Creative Writing Option

    The Creative Writing (CW) Option of the major is aimed at those students who want to pursue a career as a writer of poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, or drama. Admission to a Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) program is typically based upon writing samples, recommendations, academic history, and--increasingly--publications; therefore, students interested in pursuing the M.F.A. should concentrate upon developing an excellent portfolio of poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, and/or drama. Students interested in M.A. or Ph.D. programs in creative writing, as well as those who plan to enter the fields of publishing and/or editing, should also follow these guidelines. In addition to courses in creative writing, students are well advised to take a range of courses in literature, particularly those in their primary genre(s), in order to familiarize themselves with major writers and literary traditions.

    The B.A. in English, CW Option, requires 54 hours. The 30 hours in English beyond the in-major core are distributed as follows:

    • 3 hours: Introduction to Creative Writing (2744).
    • 3 hours: Creative Writing: Fiction (3704).
    • 3 hours: Creative Writing: Poetry (3714).
    • 3 hours: A 3000-4000 level Creative Writing elective chosen from the following: Playwriting I (3315); Playwriting II (3316); Creative Writing: Creative Non-Fiction (3724); Creative Writing: Fiction for Young People (4724).
    • 3 hours: A course in modern or contemporary literature chosen from the following: Modern Poetry (4504); Contemporary Poetry (4514); Modern Drama (4564); Contemporary Fiction (4664).
    • Other Requirement: Completion of the ePortfolio.
    • 15 hours: Five English elective courses; at least six hours must be at the 4000 level, and no more than three hours can be below the 3000 level. These electives may include 3704, 3714, and 3724, which may each be repeated twice for a total of nine hours. Note that Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction (4704) and Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry (4714) may not be repeated for credit.

    For more information, please consult the Creative Writing web pages (http://www.english.vt.edu/undergraduate/cw/index.html).

Minors in English

    The department offers four minors in English. Students who want further information or advice about minoring in English should consult the Coordinator of Undergraduate Advising in Shanks Hall 329.

Minor in English--Literature, Language, and Culture

    The Minor in Literature requires 21 hours distributed as follows:

    • 3 hours: A course in writing chosen from the following: Introduction to Creative Writing (2744); Literature and Ecology (3534); Advanced Composition (3754); Technical Writing (3764); Business Writing (3774).
    • 3 hours: A period course chosen from the following: Medieval Literature (3204); Renaissance Literature (3214); Augustan Literature (3224); Romantic Literature (3234); Victorian Literature (3244); American Literature before 1900 (3254); Modernist British Literature (3264); Modernist American Literature (3274); Introduction to Old English (4124).
    • 3 hours: An author course chosen from the following: Chaucer (4114); Shakespeare I (4165); Shakespeare II (4166); Milton (4214); British Author after 1800 (4624); American Author before 1900 (4634); American Author after 1900 (4644).
    • 12 hours: Four English elective courses; no more than three hours can be below the 2000 level.
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Minor in English - Language Studies

    The Minor in Language Sciences requires 18 hours distributed as follows:

    • 6 hours: Contemporary Approaches to Linguistics (4065-4066)
    • 3 hours: Language and Society (4044)
    • 3 hours: History of the English Language (4054)
    • 3 hours: English Syntax (4074)
    • 3 hours: One elective course, chosen from among Languages of Native America (3304); Linguistic Discourse Analysis (4004); Topics in Linguistics (4084); Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics (SPAN 3494); Topics in German Language, Life, and Culture: History of the German Language (GER 4334); or an Independent Study (4974) with appropriate language content.

Minor in English--Professional Writing

    The Minor in Professional Writing requires 18 hours distributed as follows:

    • 3 hours: Professional Writing (3104).
    • 3 hours: Technical Editing and Style (3804)
    • 12 hours: Four Professional Writing electives chosen from the following: Creating User Documentation (3814); Designing Documents for Print (3824); Intercultural Issues in Professional Writing (3834); Writing and Digital Media (3844); Grant Proposal and Reports (4804); Developing On-line Content (4814); Science Writing (4824); Internship (4964, Professional writing focus).  ENGL 3104 (or substitute) and 3804 are pre-requisites for all Professional Writing electives except 4824.

Minor in English--Creative Writing

    The Minor in Creative Writing requires 21 hours distributed as follows:

    • 3 hours in the required introductory course: Introduction to Creative Writing (2744)
    • 3 hours: A literary survey course chosen from the following: Survey of British Literature (2516): Survey of American Literature (2526).
    • 12 hours: Four Creative Writing electives chosen from the following: Playwriting (3315); Playwriting (3316); Creative Writing: Fiction (3704); Creative Writing: Poetry (3714); Creative Writing: Creative Non-Fiction (3724); Creative Writing: Fiction for Young People (4724).
    • 3 hours: One course in literature chosen from the following: Literature for Children (3524); Literature and Ecology (3534); Literature and Film (3544); Bible as Literature (3584); Southern Literature (3614); Appalachian Literature (3624); African-American Literature (3634); Contemporary Poetry (4515); Contemporary Fiction (4664).

    A GPA of 2.0 or better calculated on the basis of all courses comprising the minor in Creative Writing is required for graduation. 1105, 1106, and H1204 do not count toward satisfaction of the minor.

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Post-Graduate Study

Undergraduate majors interested in pursuing advanced degrees (M.A., M.F.A., or Ph.D.) in English should, with the assistance of their professors and academic advisors, carefully plan their programs of study. It is generally a good idea to take a variety of courses and to fulfill requirements and electives with as many 3000- and 4000-level courses as possible. It is strongly recommended that students planning to undertake post-graduate study acquire a good reading knowledge of a modern and/or a classical foreign language. Getting to know professors and learning as much as possible about the professional elements of the discipline provide excellent preparation for graduate work.

First-Year Composition

    The Curriculum for Liberal Education requires a two-semester freshman sequence to fulfill Area 1 requirements. First-Year Writing (1105-1106), which the Department of English offers as part of its Writing Program, fulfills this Area I Liberal Education requirement. Honors Freshman English (1204H) may substitute for this sequence for students who qualify for placement in Honors English. 1105-1106 and 1204H share a focus on the rhetorical dimensions of writing, speaking, and visual communication, but each is a separate course with distinctive assignments and goals.

    Advanced Standing (AS): Some students are exempted from ENGL 1105 and granted Advanced Standing on the basis of three scores: SAT Critical Reading, SAT Writing, and Standardized High School Class Rank. Advanced Standing students fulfill their Freshman English requirement with the single advanced course into which they are placed: ENGL 1106 or Honors ENGL 1204H. If Advanced Standing students complete the assigned advanced course at Virginia Tech with a C- or better in the first enrollment, they receive pass/fail credit for ENGL 1105, the course from which they are exempted. Advanced Standing is a placement category for students at Virginia Tech; it is not related to the Advanced Placement (AP) courses offered in high schools or the AP exam offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS).

    Credit from AP, CLEP, and IB exams can fulfill the CLE Area 1 requirement. See "Advanced Placement," "Advanced Standing," and "International Baccalaureate" information in the Admissions section of this catalog.

Satisfactory Progress

    University policy requires that students who are making satisfactory progress toward a degree meet minimum criteria toward the Curriculum for Liberal Education (see Academics chapter in this catalog), toward the Liberal Arts and Human Sciences College Core (see first part of this chapter), and toward the degree in English.

    Satisfactory progress toward the B.A. in English requires that:

    1. Upon having attempted 72 semester credits (including transfer, advanced placement, advanced standing, credit by examination, and freshman rule), students must have passed 12 of the required 45-51 credits in English.
    2. Upon having attempted 96 semester credits, students must have an in-major grade point average of 2.0 or above.

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Undergraduate Courses (ENGL)


0014: ORAL COMMUNICATION FOR INTERNATIONAL TEACHING ASSISTANTS
For international students taking regular academic loads. Practice in preparing and delivering oral reports in an academic field, as well as advanced pronunciation and aural comprehension exercises for effective classroom communication. Pass/Fail only. X-grade allowed. (3H,1C) I,II.

1105-1106: FIRST-YEAR WRITING
1105: Introduction to rhetorical analysis, visual rhetoric, critical writing, and critical thinking; intensive reading of works in multiple genres; practice in writing and revision; fundamentals of oral presentations. 1106: Continued study in rhetorical analysis and the conventions of various genres; intensive instruction in writing and revision of work that incorporates research; experience in oral presentations. (3H,3C)

1204H: HONORS FRESHMAN ENGLISH
Introduction to analytical, critical, and interpretive writing and reading at an advanced level and accelerated pace for students whose test scores and high school work indicate readiness for the Honors level of complexity, responsibility, and initiative; in a single semester, reviews the work of 1105 and focuses on the work of 1106 at the Honors level.  Placement by the English Department required. (3H,3C)

1604: INTRODUCTION TO POETRY
This course examines the genre of poetry from the Old English period up to contemporary writers. Emphasis is on close reading and poetic forms and conventions. (3H,3C)

1614: INTRODUCTION TO SHORT FICTION
This course introduces the knowledge and skills required to read and understand short stories and novellas. Readings trace the development of short fiction from the fable and myth to contemporary narrative forms. (3H,3C)

1624: INTRODUCTION TO DETECTIVE FICTION
This course introduces students to classic and modern texts of detective fiction from a variety of historical periods and cultural traditions. (3H,3C)

1634: INTRODUCTION TO SHAKESPEARE
This course introduces Shakespeare's drama and poetry, including at least one modern adaptation of a Shakespearean play (play, novel, movie, opera, etc.). Emphasis is placed on how to read a play, how to read Shakespearean verse, and how the various genres of Shakespearean drama differ. (3H,3C)

1644: INTRODUCTION TO WORLD LITERATURE
This course examines masterpieces of world literature in translation.  Readings focus upon one or two common themes across places and times. (3H,3C)

1654: INTRODUCTION TO SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY
This course introduces a variety of speculative works within the genres of science fiction and fantasy. Attention will be given to the development and principal characteristics of each genre. Emphasis is placed on the social, cultural, and historical contexts in which specific speculative texts have been produced. (3H,3C)

1664: INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN'S LITERATURE
This introductory course examines literary and cultural questions raised by women writers throughout history and from different cultural backgrounds. Emphasis is on women's writing in English, but the course may include some literature in translation. (3H,3C)

1674: INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE
This course introduces students to some of the major writers of the African American literary tradition from such early poets as Phillis Wheatley to such contemporary novelists as Toni Morrison. The course situates the literary works within their historical and cultural contexts, but also emphasizes close readings of the texts. (3H,3C)

1684: INTRODUCTION TO DRAMA
This course examines the history, structures, and dynamics of dramatic literature and theatre practice.  Classic and contemporary texts from around the world are read with emphasis on the traditions and influences that have shaped dramatic form. (3H,3C)

2444 (CLA 2444) (HUM 2444): ANCIENT GREEK AND ROMAN MYTHOLOGY
Survey of Ancient Greek and Roman mythology and modern interpretations. In English. No knowledge of Ancient Greek or Latin required. Not for credit toward a Latin Minor. (3H,3C)

2454 (CLA 2454) (HUM 2454): ANCIENT GREEK AND LATIN LITERATURE IN ENGLISH TRANSLATION
A variable content course devoted to the study of major works of Ancient Greek and Latin literature in English translation. May be repeated for credit with different content. In English. No knowledge of Ancient Greek or Latin required. Not for credit toward a Latin Minor. (3H,3C)

2515,2516: SURVEY OF BRITISH LITERATURE
A two-course sequence introducing students to major writers of the British literary tradition; 2515 extends from the medieval period to the death of Alexander Pope in 1744; 2516 continues to the present day. This course provides the literary, historical, and social contexts necessary to comprehend significant developments in poetry, drama, prose fiction, and criticism. Pre: 1106 or H1204 or COMM 1016. (3H,3C)

2525,2526: SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE
A two-course sequence introducing students to major writers of the American literary tradition; 2525 extends from the colonial period to 1865; 2526 continues to the present day.  This course provides the literary, historical, and social contexts necessary to comprehend significant developments in poetry, drama, prose fiction, and criticism. Pre: 1106 or 1204H or COMM 1016. (3H,3C)

2604: INTRODUCTION TO CRITICAL READING
A writing intensive introduction to the techniques and theoretical  implications of close reading and to the literary genres of poetry, drama, fiction, and, in some sections, non-fiction. The focus is on four
primary texts, at least one of which was written before the eighteenth century and one after it, and on criticism of at least one of these. The course emphasizes the analytical skills, basic critical terminology, and conventions of literary criticism essential to advanced English studies.  Intended primarily for English majors and minors. Pre: 1106, H1204 or COMM 1016. Co: 2614. (3H,3C)

2614: INTRODUCTION TO ENGLISH STUDIES
A lecture/lab course in which students are introduced to the concept of the required English Studies ePortfolio, receive coaching in developing it's various components, and develop the software and technology skills necessary to create an entry-level ePortfolio that they will continue to work on during the course of their undergraduate study.  In addition to creating the ePortfolio, students learn about the discipline of English Studies and its various areas of specialization. Co: 2604. (1H,3L,2C)

2744: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
A workshop for beginning writers who want to explore their talents in poetry, drama, and fiction. Pre: 1106. (3H,3C)

2804 (AINS 2804): CONTEMPORARY NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURES
This course offers a sampling of fiction, poetry, and non-fiction by the most influential American Indian writers since 1970, authors such as Momaday, Silko, Deloria, Welch, Harjo, and Alexie. Students also learn about those aspects of cosmology and storytelling traditionally shared by all American Indian Nations, as well as about those aspects specific to the individual tribal traditions from which the authors and their characters come. Pre: 1106 or H1204 or COMM 1016. (3H,3C)

2964: FIELD STUDY
Pass/Fail only. Variable credit course.

2974: INDEPENDENT STUDY
Variable credit course.

2974H: INDEPENDENT STUDY
Variable credit course.

2984: SPECIAL STUDY
Variable credit course.

3104: INTRODUCTION TO PROFESSIONAL WRITING
This course introduces students to the theory and practice of professional writing and its functions in workplace settings. In this rhetorically-based course, students gain experience with a variety of writing situations, composing documents that solve problems or help readers make decisions. Students learn current conventions and broadly
applicable procedures for analyzing the audiences, purposes, and situations of professional writing, and learn strategies for adapting these conventions and procedures to meet the unique demands of each new situation and task. Pre: 1106 or 1204H or COMM 1016. (3H,3C)

3154: LITERATURE, MEDICINE, AND CULTURE
The representation of health and illness in literature and the cultural aspects of medicine as a practice. Pre: 1106 or H1204 or COMM 1016. (3C)

3204: MEDIEVAL LITERATURE
This course presents medieval British literature from ca. 700 to 1500 in its representative modes and defining contexts, including the literary influences of pagan antiquity, the native British (Celtic) tradition, Scandinavian and contemporary continental influences, the Crusades, the Byzantine Empire, and the philosophical traditions of neoplatonism and scholasticism.  Specific authors and texts will vary, but will include poetry, prose, and drama. Pre: 1106 or H1204 or COMM 1016. (3H,3C)

3214: RENAISSANCE LITERATURE
This course presents Renaissance British literature from 1500-1660 in its representative modes and defining contexts, including the discovery of the Copernican universe and the new world, the rise of Protestantism, the resultant Counter-reformation, the movement from humanism to empiricism, and the institution of Parliamentary democracy. Specific authors and texts will vary, but will include poetry, prose, and drama. Pre: 1106 or H1204 or COMM 1016. (3H,3C)

3224: AUGUSTAN LITERATURE
This course presents Restoration and eighteenth-century British literature from 1660 to 1800 in its representative modes and defining contexts, including the expansion of democracy, commerce, and empire, the successes and limitations of Enlightenment philosophy, and the diversification of the literary public to include women, provincial, and laboring writers.  Specific authors and texts will vary, but will include poems, essays, plays and novels. Pre: 1106 or 1204 or COMM 1016. (3H,3C)

3234: ROMANTIC LITERATURE
This course presents Romantic literature from the late eighteenth century to 1832 in its representative modes and defining contexts, including the French, American, and Industrial Revolutions, the expansion of the British empire, the rise of the novel, Gothicism, and the intellectual influence of periodical essays.  Specific authors and texts will vary, but will include poetry, fictional prose, and non-fictional prose. Pre: 1106 or H1204 or COMM 1016. (3H,3C)

3244: VICTORIAN LITERATURE
This course presents Victorian British Literature from 1832 to 1901 in its representative modes and defining contexts, including the development of modern science and the decline of traditional religion, the emergence of the mass reading public, and the glorification of the writer's role as prophet, guide, and culture critic.  Specific authors and texts will vary, but will include poems, essays, plays, and novels. Pre: 1106 or H1204 or COMM 1016. (3H,3C)

3254: AMERICAN LITERATURE BEFORE 1900
This course presents American literature from before 1900 in its representative modes and defining contexts, including colonization, the founding of the republic, the Civil War, the settlement of the west, American Romanticism, and American Realism.  Specific authors and texts will vary, but will include poetry and fictional and non-fictional prose. Pre: 1106 or H1204 or COMM 1016. (3H,3C)

3264: MODERNIST BRITISH LITERATURE
This course presents Modernist British literature from 1918-1945 in its representative modes and defining contexts, including World Wars I and II, the collapse of the British empire, the influence of Darwin, Marx, and Freud, and such literary movements as Modernism, Realism, and Stream of Consciousness.  Specific authors and texts will vary, but will include poetry, prose, and drama. Pre: 1106 or H1204 or COMM 1016. (3H,3C)

3274: MODERNIST AMERICAN LITERATURE
This course presents Modernist American literature from 1918 to 1945 in its representative modes and defining contexts, including World Wars I and II, the Great Depression, and such literary movements as Modernism and Realism.  Specific authors and texts will vary, but will include poetry, prose, and drama. Pre: 1106 or H1204 or COMM 1016. (3H,3C)

3304 (AINS 3304): THE LANGUAGES OF NATIVE AMERICA
Study of the structures of the native languages of the Americas; their interrelationships; their use in individual speech communities; contact with other languages; the interrelationships of linguistic structure, culture, and thought; their future survival. Pre: 1106 or H1204 or COMM 1016. (3H,3C)

3314: WORKING ENGLISH GRAMMAR
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of standard English written grammar.  Some attention will also be paid to the use of English grammar for varying purposes.
(3H,3C)

3315-3316 (TA 3315-3316): PLAYWRITING
A workshop course in the craft and art of playwriting which emphasizes the development of craft and the nurturing of vision and art.  3315: primary focus is on the writing of original scripts with additional attention paid to the work of influential playwrights and critics. 3316: primary focus is on the creative process of developing a play with the collaborative influences of a director, actors, designers, and other theatre professionals. Consent of instructor required for 3316. Pre: 1106 or 1204H or COMM 1016 for 3315; 3315 for 3316. (3H,3C)

3354: LITERARY AND CULTURAL CRITICISM
Introduction to the principal critical approaches used in literary analysis.  Major critical schools are covered, with attention to methodology, theoretical backgrounds, and practical interpretation. Pre: 2604. (3H,3C)

3364: TOPICS IN LITERATURE BY WOMEN
This rotating topics course examines literature written by women with different national and ethnic identities and from different historical periods. Specific content varies, but the common focus is on the fundamental issues surrounding women's writing, the critical methodologies commonly employed to analyze this writing, and the historical, social, and literary contexts influencing the particular writing being studied. May be repeated once with different content. Pre: 1106 or 1204H or COMM 1016. (3H,3C)

3404 (FR 3404): FRENCH LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
Variable content course devoted to the  study  of  major writers or periods of French literature. May be repeated  with  different  content. May  not  be taken for credit toward a major or minor in French. In English. One 2000 level English literature course required. (3H,3C)

3414 (GER 3414): GERMAN LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
A variable content course devoted to the study of major German literary works in English translation.  May be repeated with different content.  May not be taken for credit toward a major or minor in a foreign language.  No knowledge of German required.  In English. One 2000 level English literature course required. (3H,3C)

3424 (RUS 3424): RUSSIAN LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
Variable-content course devoted to the study of Russian literary classics.  Readings and lectures in English. Topics will range from general surveys of 19th century or 20th century Russian literature to more intensive study of the works of a single major author like Tolstoy or Dostoevsky.  May be repeated with different content.  No knowledge of Russian required.  In English. One 2000 level English course required. (3H,3C)

3514: ETHNIC LITERATURE FOR CHILDREN
This course examines the historical contexts of and issues surrounding ethnic literature for children.  The course considers the literature in terms of aesthetics, cultural representations, and identity.  Ethnic literatures considered may include Native American, African American, Asian American, and Latino/a.  The course also introduces other ethnic literary traditions, such as world folk tales, that influence or parallel American ethnic children's books. Pre: 1204H or 1106 or COMM 1016. (3H,3C)

3524: LITERATURE FOR CHILDREN
General critical and historical  survey  of  traditional and  contemporary  writing  for children: picture books, folk literature, modern fantasy, poetry,  drama,  modern fiction, historical fiction. (3H,3C)

3534: LITERATURE AND ECOLOGY
Study of the poetry, proses and dramatic literature that stresses human cooperation with nature conceived as a dynamic, interrelated series of cyclic feedback systems. Included are ways esthetic values (literary themes, form, vision, perception, language) intersect with selected ecological concepts such as biocentrism, the food chain, energy transfer, Gaia theory, and ecofeminism; selected works by contemporary ecologists and environmentalists, and a study of the origins of ecology in the Greek oikos or home.  This is a writing intensive course. Pre: 1106. (3H,3C)

3544 (TA 3544): LITERATURE AND CINEMA
Works of literature and the films into which  they  have been transformed; emphasis on differences between media. (3H,3C)

3584: THE BIBLE AS LITERATURE
This course focuses on the Bible both as a work of literature and as a major influence on the literatures of the world. Specific books of the Bible to be covered, as well as literary-critical approaches, will vary.
Pre: 1106 or H1204 or COMM 1016. (3H,3C)

3614: SOUTHERN LITERATURE
The literature of the American South from 1840 to the present with emphasis on 20th-century fiction, drama, and poetry.  Concentration on such writers as Faulkner, Capote, Chopin, Langston Hughes, O'Connor, Welty, Alice Walker, and others.  Exploration of such themes as importance of land, family, community; roles of industry and agrarianism; race relations. (3H,3C)

3624: APPALACHIAN LITERATURE
Appalachian writers from the 1800s to the present including Murfree,  Wolfe,  and selected contemporary authors. Course  will  treat  artistic  merit  and  such selected themes as the mountains, Appalachia as a frontier, ambivalence about the Civil  War,  religion,  folk ways and traditions, coal mining, and cottage industries. (3H,3C)

3634 (AFST 3634): AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE
African-American writings from Phyllis Wheatley through the slave narratives of the nineteenth century to such modern figures as Wright, Hughes, Baldwin, and Morrison. Pre: 1106. (3H,3C)

3644: POSTCOLONIAL CULTURAL STUDIES
Correlates theoretical, literary, and historical materials from both "western" and "indigenous" sources in order to study at least two postcolonial settings (e.g.,. Indian, African, South American, Caribbean).  Issues will include both contextual matters and literary problems. Pre: 1106. (3H,3C)

3654: ETHNIC AMERICAN LITERATURE
Variable content course which introduces major American ethnic literatures: African-American, Asian-American, Chicano/a, Arab-American, and Native American. Representative texts from one or two of these categories are examined within the cultural, historical, and geographical matrices within which they are written.  May be repeated twice for credit if the content is different. Pre: 1106 or 1204H or COMM 1016. (3H,3C)

3684: LITERATURE AND THE LAW
This course introduces students to the representation of the law and lawyers in literature.  Emphasis is placed on the cultural and historical contexts that shape our perception of the law and legal practice and on the use of facts, research, interpretation, and rhetoric in legal argument.  Junior standing required. (3H,3C)

3704: CREATIVE WRITING: FICTION
This course is designed for students who want to focus in some depth on the writing of various forms of fiction such as the short story and novella. Emphasis is on the writing the critiquing of original fiction in a workshop/studio environment, and the analysis of exemplary texts which serve as models.  Students produce a body of original fiction in draft and revised forms.  May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours. Pre: 2744. (3H,3C)

3714: CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY
This course is designed for students who want to focus in some depth on the writing of poetry.  Emphasis in on the writing and critiquing of original poetry in a workshop/studio environment, and the analysis of exemplary poems which serve as models.  Students analyze various poetic forms and produce a revised body of original poetry.  May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours. Pre: 2744. (3H,3C)

3724: CREATIVE WRITING:  CREATIVE NON-FICTION
This course is designed for students who want to focus in some depth on the writing of creative non-fiction in its various forms, including memoir, personal experience writing the lyrical essay, travel narratives, and nature writing. Emphasis is on the writing and critiquing of original creative non-fiction in a workshop/studio environment, and the analysis of exemplary texts which serve as models. Students produce a body of original non-fiction in draft and revised forms.  May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours. Pre: 2744. (3H,3C)

3744: WRITING CENTER THEORY & PRACTICE
Focus on the theory and practice of teaching writing across the disciplines in the Writing Center setting.  Emphasis is on writing center theory applied to one-on-one teaching strategies and on techniques for responding appropriately to student writing.  To take this course you must first have the professor's consent. (3H,3C)

3754: ADVANCED COMPOSITION
Advanced training in writing analytical and critical essays. Practice in addressing a range of audiences and in using varied styles and organizational patterns.  Workshop and conference for students in arts and humanities, as well as for technical and extension students who wish to address non-specialized audiences and to practice forms outside their own fields. Junior standing required. (3H,3C)

3764: TECHNICAL WRITING
Principles and procedure of technical writing; attention to analyzing audience and purpose, organizing information, designing graphic aids, and writing such specialized forms as abstracts, instructions, and proposals. Junior standing required. (3H,3C)

3774: BUSINESS WRITING
Extensive practice in forms of persuasive and informative writing such as memos, case analyses, reports, abstracts, and letters.  Designed for students in all curricula. Junior standing required. (3H,3C)

3804: TECHNICAL EDITING AND STYLE
Technical Editing and Style explores the art of editing from the initial writing task to the final delivery of the document. In addition to learning document management, students study and practice the roles, responsibilities, and tasks that editors perform. The course also covers the rules that govern the fundamentals of style (correctness, clarity, and propriety) and the principles needed to match the tone and formality to the aim, audience, and occasion of the work. Must have pre-requisites or the consent of the Director of Professional Writing. Pre: 3104. (3H,3C)

3814: CREATING USER DOCUMENTATION
This course prepares students to produce both print and online user documentation that enables people to accomplish a given set of tasks (e.g., user guides, online help, policy and procedure manuals, tutorials, and how-to books). Readings include rhetorical theory and discussions of professional practice. Students learn the principles of user and task analysis, information design, usability testing, and indexing. In addition, they have opportunities for hands-on experience with clients and end-users. Must have pre-requisites or the consent of the Director of Professional Writing. Pre: 3804. (3H,3C)

3824: DESIGNING DOCUMENTS FOR PRINT
This course prepares students to design and produce complex documents such as proposals, brochures, booklets, and newsletters using computer technologies. Students learn rhetorical and visual factors (e.g., legibility, readability, layout, and integration of text/images) that contribute to the effectiveness and usability of documents. In addition, students study the use of color and electronic image editing. They also master some of the technologies necessary to publish documents from their desktops. In addition to working on individual projects, students engage in collaborative exercises intended to sharpen their teamwork, editing, writing, audience- awareness, and design skills. Must have prerequisite or consent of the Director of Professional Writing. Pre: 3804. (3H,3C)

3834: INTERCULTURAL ISSUES IN PROFESSIONAL WRITING
Focuses on intercultural and international issues in the global workplace.  Explores, through examination of theoretical perspectives and practical applications, ways in which notions about culture and national identity shape professional interactions.  Provides a foundational understanding of the issues involved in writing and designing documents for international audiences. Pre: 3804. (3H,3C)

3844: WRITING AND DIGITAL MEDIA
Introduces professional writing students to the fundamental practices and emerging theories of writing with, and for, digital media. Pre: 1106 or 1204H. (3H,3C)

3954: STUDY ABROAD
Variable credit course. X-grade allowed.

3984: SPECIAL STUDY
Variable credit course.

4004: LINGUISTIC DISCOURSE ANALYSIS
Introduction to discourse analysis. This course examine spoken and written discourses of English. Further attention will be paid to how discourse functions in political, legal, medical, and educational contexts. (3H,3C)

4024: CULTURAL STUDIES THEORY AND PRACTICE
In-depth study of major theories of cultural studies with attention to their practical application in the interpretation of images, texts, artifacts, institutions, experiences, and practices. Pre-requisite: Completion of at least 60 credit hours Pre: 3354. (3H,3C)

4044: LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY
English language variation in the United States is considered from a current sociolinguistic perspective. Social, regional, ethnic, gender, and stylistic-related language variation are covered, along with models for collecting, describing, and applying knowledge about language variation. Students are exposed to a wide range of data on language variation, with emphasis on vernacular varieties of American English. Pre: 1106 or 1204H. (3H,3C)

4054: HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
Development of English including both its internal history (sounds, vocabulary, inflections, syntax) and its external history (political, social, and intellectual forces).  Indo-European  origins  through the present, with special emphasis on the English Language in America. (3H,3C)

4065-4066: CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO LINGUISTICS
Thorough introductions to the core areas of the discipline of linguistics, as well as a number of subfields that make up this wide ranging field of study. Phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, language change. (3H,3C)

4074: ENGLISH SYNTAX
This course introduces the grammatical structures of the English language and the processes by which we create and comprehend English sentences.  Emphasis is on recent linguistic models.  Topics include morphological structure, form- and structure-class taxonomy, phrase structure, transformational and generative approaches, language variation.  Alternative models will be considered. Pre: 1106. (3H,3C)

4084: TOPICS IN LINGUISTICS
An advanced course in such areas of linguistics as phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, language change, dialectology, etc.  Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of natural language data within contemporary theoretical frameworks.  Individual sections will focus upon differing areas of linguistics (to be specified in the subtitle of the course). Repeatable with different content for a maximum of nine credits. Pre: 4064 or 4074. (3H,3C)

4114: CHAUCER
This course examines the life, work, and critical reception of Geoffrey Chaucer.  Junior standing required. (3H,3C)

4124: INTRODUCTION TO OLD ENGLISH
Introduction to Old English grammar and reading of Old English poetry and prose. Senior standing required. (3H,3C)

4165,4166: SHAKESPEARE
The plays of Shakespeare.  4165:  Shakespeare's early career (1590-1600), including history plays from HENRY VI to HENRY V, comedies from THE COMEDY OF ERRORS to THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR, and early tragedies such as ROMEO AND JULIET and JULIUS CAESAR.  4166:  the later career, including "problem plays" such as MEASURE FOR MEASURE, the great tragedies (HAMLET, KING LEAR, OTHELLO, MACBETH), and the romances such as THE TEMPEST. (3H,3C)

4214: MILTON
Milton's poetry from the early works, including COMUS, LYCIDAS, and the sonnets, to his major late works PARADISE LOST, PARADISE REGAINED, and SAMSON AGONISTES; with some attention to the important prose and to the historical context in which he wrote. (3H,3C)

4405,4406: THE ENGLISH NOVEL
4405: Development of the English novel to 1850, including such novelists as Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Austen, the Brontes, and Thackeray.  4406:  Major novels from 1850 to World War II, including Dickens, Trollope, Eliot, Gaskell, Hardy, Woolf, Joyce, Lawrence, Huxley, and Waugh. (3H,3C)

4414: TOPICS IN SPECULATIVE FICTION
This variable content course offers an advanced exploration of deliberately anti-realistic narratives such as science fiction, utopian and dystopian fiction, and fantasy.  May be taken twice with differing content.  Junior standing required. (3H,3C)

4415,4416: AMERICAN NARRATIVE TO 1950
4415:  The history of American narrative to 1865; 4416:  The history of American narrative from 1865 to 1950; genres to be addressed may include diaries, journals, letters, autobiographies, narratives of captivity, essays, sermons, folktales, short fiction, and novels.  Junior standing required. (3H,3C)

4424: DIGITAL LITERARY CULTURE
The interpretation of literary forms produced specifically for digital environments.  Students will learn to analyze the design and rhetoric of hypertexts and hypermedia. Pre: 3354. (3H,3C)

4504: MODERN POETRY
British and American poetry from 1900 to World War II with emphasis on such figures as Pound, Williams, Stevens, Yeats, Sylvia Plath, Stevie Smith, and Eliot. (3H,3C)

4514: CONTEMPORARY POETRY
British and American poetry from World War II to the present, with emphasis on such figures as Bishop, Lowell, Ashbery, Heaney, and Hughes. (3H,3C)

4564: MODERN DRAMA
Plays by 19th and 20th century British, American, and continental dramatists, beginning with Ibsen and Shaw and culminating with Beckett and the contemporary Theatre of the Absurd. (3H,3C)

4624: STUDIES IN A BRITISH AUTHOR AFTER 1800
This course examines the life, work, and critical reception of a single major British author (or pair of closely associated authors) writing after 1800.  May be taken up to 3 times with different content.  Junior standing required. (3H,3C)

4634: STUDIES IN AN AMERICAN AUTHOR BEFORE 1900
This course examines the life, work, and critical reception of a single major American author (or a pair of closely associated authors) writing before 1900.  May be taken up to three times with different content. Junior standing is required. (3H,3C)

4644: STUDIES IN AN AMERICAN AUTHOR AFTER 1900
This course examines the life, work, and critical reception of a single major American author (or pair of closely associated authors) writing after 1900.  May be taken up to three times with different content. Junior standing is required. (3H,3C)

4664: CONTEMPORARY FICTION
Fiction since 1945 with emphasis upon the most recent two decades:  the late modernist narratives of Bellow, Updike, and Percy; the new fiction of Barth, Hawkes, Barthelme; the postmodern fiction of Federman, Carter, Fowles, Katz, Sukenick. (3H,3C)

4674: STUDIES IN CONTEMPORARY CULTURE
Studies the emerging changes across arts media (including architecture, cyberculture, essay, fiction, film, painting, performance, photography, poetry, theatre, video) in relation to current cultural and social theory from a variety of disciplines (including architectural theory, art, history, literature, philosophy, psychoanalysis, and social sciences). (3H,3C)

4684: SPECIAL TOPICS IN LITERATURE
An advanced, variable-content course which explores a significant or emergent literary issue or approach, or a body of literature.  May be taken twice with different content. Pre: 3204 or 3214 or 3224 or 3234 or 3244 or 3254 or 3264 or 3274. (3H,3C)

4704: ADVANCED CREATIVE WRITING: FICTION
Designed for senior English majors who have selected the Creative Writing option, this is an intensive, advanced workshop.  This capstone course builds on skills students have acquired in creative writing workshops. Primary focus is on the writing and critiquing of original fiction, while paying close attention to the work of established writers who are acknowledged masters of their genres.  Students hone their skills as peer reviewers and constructive critics.  In the process, they produce a portfolio of their own fiction. Pre: 3704. (3H,3C)

4714: ADVANCED CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY
Designed for senior English majors who have selected the Creative Writing option, this is an intensive, advanced workshop.  This capstone course builds on the skills acquired in previous creative writing workshops.  Primary focus is on the writing and critiquing of original poems, while paying close attention to the work of established poets who are acknowledged masters of their genres. Students hone their skills as peer reviewers and constructive critics.  In the process, they produce a portfolio of their own poetry. Pre: 3714. (3H,3C)

4724: CREATIVE WRITING: FICTION FOR YOUNG PEOPLE
This course is conducted in a workshop setting in which students compose original stories for young people. Elementary techniques of fiction are emphasized, such as plot structure, point of view, setting, characterization, and audience. Must have prerequisites or permission of the instructor. Pre: 3704. (3H,3C)

4734: SENIOR PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT IN CREATIVE WRITING
A course focused on the development of the senior portfolio and on making an effective and well-informed transition from undergraduate study to careers or graduate/professional school.  English majors in the Creative Writing option only. (1H,1C)

4774: SENIOR PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT IN LITERATURE, LANGUAGE, AND CULTURE
A course focused on the development of the senior portfolio and on making an effective and well-informed transition from undergraduate study to careers or graduate/professional school.  English majors in the Literature, Language, and Culture option only. Pre: 2614. (1H,1C)

4784: SENIOR SEMINAR
Designed for senior English majors, this is a variable topics, in-depth study of a particular issue or theme in language or literature.  This capstone course aims to integrate and synthesize previous work in the discipline, focusing especially on close reading, research, and writing skills. Pre: 1106. (3H,3C)

4804: GRANT PROPOSALS AND REPORTS
This course prepares students to write effective proposals, reports, and informational articles.  Students learn to define and write problem statements, program objectives, plans of action, evaluation plans, budget presentations, and summaries.  In addition, they sharpen their teamwork, editing, writing, audience awareness, and design skills as they engage in collaborative projects with campus and/or non-profit organizations in the community.  Prerequisite or consent of the instructor is required. Pre: 3804. (3H,3C)

4814: DEVELOPING ONLINE CONTENT
Covers the process of creating documents for online environments. Builds on knowledge and skills acquired in foundational Professional Writing courses. Involves production of websites from scratch, starting with low-fidelity mockups and advancing to formatting layouts adaptable to the diverse screen sizes of computers and mobile devices. Focuses on a balance of structure (code), content (information), and format (presentation and design). Pre: 3804, 3844. (3H,3C)

4824: SCIENCE WRITING
Writing in and about the natural and social sciences. Students will write documents such as abstracts, research proposals, and ethnographies, analyze the development of disciplinary writing practices, and study non-fiction science writing for general audiences.  Senior standing or instructor approval required. Pre: 1106 or 1204H or COMM 1016. (3H,3C)

4864: SENIOR PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT IN PROFESSIONAL WRITING
A course focused on the development of the senior portfolio and on making an effective and well-informed transition from undergraduate study to careers or graduate/professional school.  English majors in the Professional Writing option only. Pre: 2614. (1H,1C)

4874: ISSUES IN PROFESSIONAL AND PUBLIC DISCOURSE
In this course designed for English majors in the Professional Writing Option, students will focus on the ways in which scientific, technical, and professional communication influence, and are influenced by, public discourse.  Drawing on strategies of rhetorical criticism, students will gain an understanding of the persuasive value of style, arrangement, and delivery by investigating their professional roles in helping to structure public debate. Pre: 3804. (3H,3C)

4954: STUDY ABROAD: ISSUES AND TEXTS
An advanced, variable-content and multi-disciplinary course that explores global themes and literature(s) during a month-long, faculty-led summer study abroad experience. Pre-requisite: Junior Standing required. Variable credit course, repeatable up to 6 credits. Variable credit course.

4964: FIELD STUDY
Variable credit course.

4974: INDEPENDENT STUDY
Variable credit course.

4974H: INDEPENDENT STUDY
Variable credit course.

4984: SPECIAL STUDY
Variable credit course. X-grade allowed.

4994: UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
Variable credit course.

4994H: UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
Variable credit course.


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Virginia Tech 2013-2014 Undergraduate Course Catalog and Academic Policies