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2009-2010 Undergraduate Course Catalog & Academic Policies

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College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

Dairy Science

Student with Jersey cowwww.dasc.vt.edu/

R. M. Akers, Head and Horace E. and Elizabeth Alpin Professor
David R. and Margaret Lincicome Professor: F. C. Gwazdauskas
Professors: M. A. Barnes; B. G. Cassell; R. E. James; M. L. McGilliard; R. E. Pearson;
C. C. Stallings
Associate Professors: M. D. Hanigan; K. F. Knowlton.
Assistant Professors: B. A. Corl; I. K. Mullarky; C. S. Petersson-Wolfe
Lecturer: D.R. Winston
Career Advisor: M. A. Barnes
Professor Emeritus: J. H. Herbein; R. L. Nebel; G. M. Jones; C. E. Polan;
R. G. Saacke; J. M. White


Overview

    The purpose of the dairy science program is to offer students the opportunity to prepare themselves for a wide variety of careers by developing both their technical and interpersonal skills. Key factors in achieving this purpose are a challenging yet flexible curriculum that can be individualized to meet the educational needs and interests of each student, counseling to assist each student in designing individual programs, and extracurricular activities to enhance development of interpersonal skills.

    Students may select from three curricula: production business management; science/biotechnology/pre-veterinary; and dual major. All options provide students with the opportunity to acquire a broad education in the sciences, social sciences, economics, mathematics, and communications while learning the basic principles of dairy enterprise management.

Dairy Enterprise Management Option

    This is the most flexible curriculum, with at least 30 credits of electives. Suited to students with an interest in various fields of dairy production (herd manager, farm manager), allied agri-business industries (feed, artificial insemination, equipment), agricultural communications, public relations, extension, breed fieldperson, and a variety of other positions. Graduates in this option have also gone on to careers in college instruction, elementary school instruction, bank investment management, feed sales, and milk marketing, to name a few.

Biotechnology/Pre-Vet Option

    This option is recommended for students who plan to continue into veterinary college or other graduate or professional schools, or who plan a career in quality control, laboratory work, or research and product development. It provides an excellent base in chemistry, mathematics, physics, biology and biochemistry for advanced study in many areas.

Dual Emphasis Option

    This option is recommended for students who plan to concentrate in more than one academic area as they prepare for future careers. A few of the popular minors and double majors that students may earn while completing their Dairy Science degree requirements include: Agricultural Economics, Animal and Poultry Sciences, Biology, Computer Sciences, and Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, etc.

Opportunities to Excel

    Dairy science students may elect to dual major or minor in animal science, agricultural economics, or any of many other departments. Students are also encouraged to actively participate in extracurricular clubs and judging teams.

    Active participation in research projects in lactation, genetics, nutrition, reproduction, and management provide qualified students valuable research experience with departmental scientists as well as part-time employment opportunities. These opportunities are available to students in all options and enhance their preparation for advanced study and provide a better understanding of the research process.

    The dairy science honors program offers outstanding students the opportunity to enrich and broaden their academic programs. Honors students work closely with individual faculty members in choosing honors classes, colloquia, independent study, and research projects. Graduation "in honors" requires successful completion of university honors requirements, a comprehensive oral examination, and an honors thesis.

    Graduate programs of study leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. also are offered (see Graduate Catalog).

Course Requirements

    All curricula for the various options contain a core of courses to assist students in developing knowledge and ability in natural sciences (biology and chemistry), computational skills (math and computer science), writing and communication (English, communications, and seminars), as well as animal physiology and production, nutrition and genetics, farm finance, food science and dairy sciences. A list of courses specified for each option may be obtained upon request from the department. In the following listing, semester hour credits are shown at the right.

Dairy Science Major credits
DASC 2474/Dairy Science & Industry 2
DASC 2484/Dairy Cattle Evaluation *3
DASC 3274/Applied Dairy Nutrition *3
DASC 3474/Dairy Information Systems 3
DASC 4475-4476/Dairy Enterprise Mgt. *6
DASC 4174/Applied Dairy Genetics *3
DASC 4304/Applied Reproduction *2
DASC 4074/Professional Development 3
DASC 4374/Physiology of Lactation 3
ALS 2304/Animal Phys. & Anatomy 4
ALS 3104/Animal Genetics 3
ALS 3204/Animal Nutrition 3
ALS 3304/Phys. of Reproduction 3
Total: 41

* Must complete two of these for the Biotechnology/Pre-vet Option.

Math & Natural Sciences
Chemistry 6-8
Mathematics & Statistics 6
Biology 8
Microbiology 4
Total Credits: 24-26
Social Sciences & Humanities
Agric. Econ. or Economics 6
English 6
Humanities, Global, Aesthetics 10
Total Credits: 22
Elective credits (minimum): 28-30
Total credits for graduation: 120

Requirements for Minor in Dairy Science

    Requirements include DASC 2474 (2 cr.), DASC 3474 (3 cr.), DASC 4374 (3 cr.), and DASC 4475 or DASC 4476 (3 cr.). Nine additional credits in DASC electives are also required.

Satisfactory Progress

After completion of 72 semester credits (including transfer, advanced placement, advanced standing and credit by examination, "satisfactory progress" will include the following:

  • completion of 24 semester credit in any area of the Curriculum for Liberal Education
  • completion of 9 semester credits in required in-major courses

Undergraduate Course Descriptions (ALS)

1004: AGRICULTURE, THE ARTS AND SOCIETY
Introduction to the relationships among agriculture, society, and the arts, all of which are integral components of civilization. Pass/Fail only. (1H,1C) I, II.

1504: INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES
Concepts and issues important for early orientation of all students considering a career in agriculture and life sciences, and a review of state, national, and international agricultural issues will be covered in relation to majors in the College. I (1H,1C)

1514: MICROCOMPUTERS IN AGRICULTURE
Microcomputer course designed primarily for agriculture students. Emphasis is put on learning the basic skills needed to solve agricultural problems with a microcomputer. Topics include: hardware, electronic spreadsheets, word processors, data base management systems, computer graphics, and communications. (1H,3L,2C) I,II.

2304: COMPARATIVE ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY AND ANATOMY
Comparative anatomy and physiology of domestic mammals and birds including cell neural, musculoskeletal, respiratory, cardiovascular, urinary, and endocrine systems. Pre: BIOL 1106. (3H,2L,4C) I,II.

2404 (BIOL 2404): BIOTECHNOLOGY IN A GLOBAL SOCIETY
Introduction to the world-wide impact of biotechnology and molecular biology, including applications to plants, animals, and microorganisms. Explores basic concepts of genetic engineering, scientific and ethical issues, and public concerns related to biotechnology. Topics include: environmental release of genetically engineering organisms, bioremediation, safety of genetically engineered food products, transgenic plants and animals, gene therapy, and genetic screening. Pre: (BIOL 1015, BIOL 1016) or (BIOL 1105, BIOL 1106) or (BIOL 1205H, BIOL 1206H), (CHEM 1015, CHEM 1016). (3H,3C) II.

2504: ANIMALS IN SOCIETY
Overview of animal well-being and behavior, human-animal interactions, responsibilities to animals, animal care, behavior, disease and pain recognition and current topics concerning companion animals, domestic animals and wildlife. (2H,3L,3C) II.

2964: FIELD STUDY
Variable credit course.

2974: INDEPENDENT STUDY
Variable credit course.

2984: SPECIAL STUDY
Variable credit course.

3104: ANIMAL BREEDING AND GENETICS
Principles of genetics related to improvement of domestic farm animals. Molecular, cellular and physiological genetics, estimation of breeding values, selection, heritabilities, genetic correlations, relationships, in-breeding, heterosis, genetic abnormalities. I Pre: BIOL 1105, STAT 2004. (2H,2L,3C)

3134: LIVESTOCK AND THE ENVIRONMENT
Environmental issues associated with animal agriculture. Nutrient contamination of water resources, odor emission from livestock farms, environmental regulations affecting animal agriculture, and management practices to reduce the impacts of livestock farms on air and water quality. II. Pre: BIOL 1005, BIOL 1006 or BIOL 1105, BIOL 1106. (3H,3C)

3204: ANIMAL NUTRITION AND FEEDING
Characteristics, sources, digestion, absorption, and metabolism of water, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, vitamins, and minerals. Feeding systems for livestock, poultry and companion animals. Pre: 2304, (CHEM 1036 or CHEM 1036H or CHEM 1016). (3H,3C) I,II.

3304: PHYSIOLOGY OF REPRODUCTION
Physiological mechanisms that control and affect reproductive processes in domestic mammals, birds and other selected species. Pre: 2304. (2H,3L,3C)

3954: STUDY ABROAD
Variable credit course.

4404 (GEOG 4404) (NR 4404) (UAP 4404): APPROACHES TO INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
An introduction to issues relating to international development. The course will focus on areas to help students better understand the interdependencies between countries and how institutions and organizations can foster effective working relationships on global projects of mutual interest between countries. (1H,1C) I.

4504: NATURAL RESOURCE CONSERVATION
Designed primarily to train elementary and secondary teachers, supervisors, and administrators in natural resource conservation. A three-week course. Emphasis is placed on soils, water, geology, forestry, wildlife, and marine life. Available for graduate credit except to agronomy, forestry, and wildlife majors. (3H,3L,4C) III.

4524: FARMING SYSTEMS RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
Characteristics of extensive and intensive farming systems in developing countries. Comparison with U.S. small farming systems. Methods of multi-disciplinary team organization, informal team surveys, grouping farm households, and design and analysis of on-farm trials. Introduction of these methods into developing country and domestic research and extension systems. I (3H,3C)

4554 (BIOL 4554): NEUROCHEMICAL REGULATION
Neurochemical transmission within the vertebrate brain will be examined. Emphasis will be placed on the chemical coding underlying the control of various behaviors and how these systems can be modified by various drugs or diet. Pre: (2304 or BIOL 3404), CHEM 2535. (3H,3C) II.

4574 (BIOL 4574): SOCIAL BEHAVIOR OF BIRDS AND MAMMALS
This course examines origins, influences and implications of social behavior in a variety of avian and mammalian species. Emphasis is placed on understanding group organization and dynamics in inter and intra-species situations. Experimental data from several disciplines (e.g., genetics, physiology, biochemistry) are reviewed to demonstrate their associations with behavioral adaptive mechanisms. Avian and mammalian species living in wild, zoo, agricultural, companion and laboratory settings are discussed. Pre: 3104 or BIOL 2004, BIOL 1106. (3H,3C)

4614 (NR 4614): WATERSHED ASSESSMENT, MANAGEMENT, AND POLICY
Multidisciplinary perspectives of assessment, management and policy issues for protecting and improving watershed ecosystems. Topics include: monitoring and modeling approaches for assessment, risk-based watershed assessment geographic information systems for watershed analysis, decision support systems and computerized decision tools for watershed management, policy alternatives for watershed protection, urban watersheds, and current issues in watershed management. Pre: Two 4000 level courses in environmental/natural
resource science, management, engineering, and/or policy in BSE, CEE, FOR, GEOL, LAR, CSES, ENT, BIO, GEOG, AAEC, UAP or equivalent. (2H, 2C). II. (2H,2C)

4964: FIELD STUDY/PRACTICUM
Variable credit course.

4974: INDEPENDENT STUDY
Variable credit course.

4984: SPECIAL STUDY
Variable credit course.

4994: UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
Variable credit course.

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Undergraduate Course Descriptions (DASC)

1574: INTRODUCTION TO DAIRY SCIENCE
The scope of the dairy science undergraduate program is presented. Preparation for careers in dairy production and related industries. May be taken only by new freshmen and transfer students. I (1H,1C)

2474: DAIRY SCIENCE AND INDUSTRY
Science, technology, and business associated with production, processing, and marketing of milk and milk products. Biology of dairy cattle with emphasis on genetics, reproduction, lactation, and nutrition. Management of dairy herds.
(2H,2C) II.

2484: DAIRY CATTLE EVALUATION
Critical appraisal of dairy cattle conformation and experience in linear trait scoring, linear trait relationships to profitability, competitive judging;
written and oral justification; organization and conduct of shows and contests; showmanship. (6L,2C) II.

2964: FIELD STUDY
Variable credit course.

2974: INDEPENDENT STUDY
Variable credit course.

2984: SPECIAL STUDY
Variable credit course.

3274: APPLIED DAIRY CATTLE NUTRITION
Application of basic principles of nutrition in developing rations for dairy herds. Emphasis is placed on appropriate use of forages, ration formulation techniques, development of profitable rations, and ration delivery. I (3H,3C)

3474: DAIRY INFORMATION SYSTEMS
Development, function, and use of dairy information systems including computerized performance testing programs for dairy cattle improvement and dairy herd management. (3H,3C)

4074: PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
This is a capstone course addressing issues of importance in the dairy industry and society in general. The course will emphasize the use of writing to promote critical thinking, evaluation and problem solving, and developing and presenting persuasive arguments. Instruction will be provided on selecting, securing, and succeeding in careers (career choices, resumes, application letters, interviewing, etc.) (3H,3C) I.

4174: APPLIED DAIRY CATTLE GENETICS
Application of genetic principles to dairy cattle improvement. Setting goals for genetic improvement, characteristics of traits included in selection, current methods of estimating breeding values, the role of artificial insemination and breed associations in genetic improvement, cattle genetics. (2H,3L,3C) II.

4304: PRINCIPLES & PRACTICES OF BOVINE REPRODUCTION
Principles and techniques in reproductive physiology and herd management related to health, record keeping, estrus detection and synchronization, and ultrasonography. Ovarian function and superovulation, semen handling, artificial insemination and pregnancy detection are also considered. (1H,3L,2C) I.

4374: PHYSIOLOGY OF LACTATION
Anatomy of the mammary gland and physiology of lactation in domestic and laboratory mammals with emphasis on dairy cattle. Mammary gland health and factors affecting lactation. Principles and techniques in dairy herd milking management. Pre: ALS 2304. (2H,3L,3C) II.

4384: MAMMARY IMMUNOLOGY
This course is designed to provide students with basic knowledge of immunology as related to diseases of the mammary gland. Concepts of mammary gland immunity, disease etiology, immunopathology, diagnosis and therapy will be covered with a focus on ungulate species. Host pathogen interactions, solving problems, writing intensive, literature search. Pre: ALS 2304, ENGL 1106. (3H,3C)

4475-4476: DAIRY ENTERPRISE MANAGEMENT
Decision strategies for modern dairy businesses. 4475: Emphasis on relationships of enterprises and techniques for evaluation of business alternatives, efficiency of production, and profit. Use of microcomputer software to support management decisions. 4476: Concentration on herd replacements, personnel, facilities and issues of management associated with rapidly changing national and international markets, environmental regulations, and computer applications. Group projects and hands-on management of university dairy herd. Pre: 2474 or AAEC 3404 for 4475; 4475 for 4476. 4475: (3H,3C) 4476: (2H,3L,3C)

4964: FIELD STUDY
Variable credit course.

4974: INDEPENDENT STUDY
Variable credit course.

4984: SPECIAL STUDY
Variable credit course.

4994: UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
Variable credit course.

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Virginia Tech 2009-2010 Undergraduate Course Catalog and Academic Policies