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Liberal Arts and Human Sciences

Apparel, Housing, and Resource Management

www.ahrm.vt.edu/

LuAnn R. Gaskill, Head
Residential Property Management Advisory Board Professor: R.C. Goss
International Textile and Apparel Association Fellow: M.J.T. Norton
Professors: J.O. Beamish; L.R. Gaskill; R.C. Goss; D.H. Kincade; M.J.T. Norton; K. Parrott
Associate Professors: H.I. Chen-Yu; J.M. Emmel; I.E. Leech
Assistant Professors: S. Anong; P.J. Fisher; C.R. Hayhoe; J. Kim; K. Mitchell


Overview

    The mission of the Department of Apparel, Housing, and Resource Management is to improve quality of life for individuals, families, and the broader community by creating and extending knowledge in apparel, housing, and resource management. We apply business, consumer and design perspectives to teaching and learning, research, and outreach.

    The AHRM Department includes three areas of program concentration--Apparel, Housing, and Resource Management. The following statements briefly describe the program concentrations.

Apparel focuses on the domestic and international concerns of consumers in relation to apparel and textiles and of manufacturers and retailers of those products. Basic to these concerns are social, cultural, political, economic, and technological factors that affect consumer satisfaction with apparel and other textile products. The program prepares students for careers in business and government services through required courses that build essential knowledge and skills relevant to the design, production, marketing, distribution, and use of apparel and textile products. The program includes options in Apparel Design and Merchandising Management.
Housing focuses on the residential environment, especially planning, design, marketing and management. Required courses emphasize both human and business factors, including current issues and practices, which influence the environment of housing. Field work experiences and professional contacts supplement students' course work in housing, business, residential design, and related subjects. The program prepares students for careers in residential property management, the kitchen and bath industries, and other businesses and agencies involved in the design, development and management of housing. The program includes options in Housing and Residential Property Management.
Resource Management focuses on the principles and processes involved in recognition, creation and allocation of human and material resources to foster well-being. Consumer studies courses build students' knowledge of households in the dual roles of consumers and producers in a global market affected by government policy, and enable students to analyze issues from the consumer, business, and government perspectives. Financial counselors provide debt crisis management and budgeting advice to those who may be experiencing problems managing their personal finances. The program prepares students for careers in consumer affairs, human resources, marketing and sales, credit and business management.
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Apparel

    The field of clothing and textiles addresses the domestic and international concerns of apparel and textile manufacturers and retailers and their consumers. Basic to these concerns are the social, economic, technological, and cultural factors affecting consumer acceptance and use of apparel and textile products and the contributions the apparel and textile industries make to the national and global economies.

    Programs prepare students for careers in business, industry, and governmental services. The Curriculum for Liberal Education and program core courses are intended to provide students with a broad liberal education and with knowledge and skills fundamental to understanding the design, production, marketing, distribution, and use of apparel and textile products. Through coursework, internships., study tours, student organizations, and interaction with industry experts, students prepare for careers in the field.

    Options within the curriculum allow students to develop depth in a specific area of the field. The two options offered are apparel design and merchandising management.

    Required for all Apparel Students:
    AHRM 1204 Clothing and People
    AHRM 1224 Basic Apparel Assembly
    AHRM 2204 Introduction to Textiles
    AHRM 2214 Apparel Textiles Lab
    AHRM 2264 Introduction to the Fashion Industry
    AHRM 2404 Consumer Rights
    AHRM 2984 Introduction to CAD in Clothing and Textiles
    AHRM 3214 Apparel Quality Evaluation
    AHRM 4204 Introduction to Textile Evaluation
    AHRM 4214 Economics of the Textile and Apparel Industry
    AHRM 4224 Fashion Analysis and Communication
    ECON 2005-2006 Principles of Economics
    LAHS 1104 Professional Perspectives
    LAHS 3004 Professional Seminar
    MKTG 3104 Marketing Management
    SOC 1004
    or PSYC 2004
    Introductory Sociology
    Introductory Psychology
    Select one of the following courses:
    ACIS 1504 Intro to Business Information Systems
    COMM 2004 Public Speaking
    ENGL 3764 Technical Writing

Apparel Design Option

Career Advisor: J. Kim

    Students specializing in apparel design may be employed as designers, stylists, patternmakers, or production managers for diverse types of fashion and special-use apparel and accessories. Courses within the option provide students with experience in advanced garment assembly, pattern grading and garment fit, patternmaking, draping, two- and three-dimensional designing, fashion illustration, and industrial sewing techniques.

    Required for Apparel Design students:
    AHRM 2014 Advanced Apparel Assembly
    AHRM 2024 Apparel Structure and Fit
    AHRM 2254 Idea Development & Creativity in Apparel Design
    AHRM 2984 Fashion Illustration
    AHRM 3014 Advanced Patternmaking
    AHRM 4014 Senior Studio
    AHRM 4024 Portfolio
    AHRM 4034 History of Costume

Merchandising Management Option

Career Advisor: D. Kincade

    Students specializing in merchandising management may find employment with apparel or textile manufacturers or with various types of retailers or fashion media. Management training programs are offered by many companies and lead to such positions as buyers, fashion coordinators, merchandise managers, store managers, product development managers, and visual merchandisers.

    Courses provide information regarding production, promotion, and distribution of apparel and textile products, including merchandise selection and assortment, costing and pricing strategies, store planning, and consumer buying behavior. Supporting courses in business, marketing management, and communications provide additional information for this option.

    Required for Merchandising Management students:
    ACIS 2004 Survey of Accounting
    AHRM 3104 Fashion Retailing Concepts
    AHRM 3124 Clothing Behavior Patterns
    MGT 3304 Management Theory & Leadership Practice
    AHRM 4984 Merchandising Strategies
    Nine credit hours in one of the following areas:
    Product Management
    Retail Management
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Housing Option

    Career Advisor: K. Parrott

    The Housing Option focuses on the residential environment, especially planning, design, and marketing. Required courses emphasize design, human, social, and business factors, including current issues and practices, which influence the environment of housing. The diversity of the population with differing needs, the range of available products, the growth of regulation, the increased concern for health and safety, and the rapid changes in technology are among the factors that lead to a very complex market place in the housing industry.

    There will be many opportunities for graduates of the Housing Option, especially as certified kitchen or bath designers, which provides employment as well as business opportunities. Other employment opportunities include manufacturing and sales of the kitchen, bath and other residential products, residential construction, home furnishings, appliance, and related industries. The future looks bright for those students who choose careers in the housing industry. A number of trend and demographic indicators suggest that people will continue to spend money on their homes, and need products and services from experts. There will be a strong, on-going need in the housing industry for well-educated professionals with specialized knowledge in design and the ability to think and solve complex problems.

    The Housing Option program in kitchen and bath design is endorsed by the National Kitchen and Bath Association, and interested students can prepare to sit for the first level design certification examination immediately after graduation. All students in the option are mentored by industry members of the Center for Real Life Kitchen Design Advisory Board. Classroom learning is expanded through field trips, guest speakers, community clients, internships, competitions, and other special projects.

    Required:
    AHRM 2204 Introduction to Textiles
    AHRM 2214 Apparel Textiles Laboratory
    AHRM 2254 Idea Development and Creativity
    AHRM 2404 Consumer Rights
    AHRM 2504 Resource Management for Individuals and Families
    AHRM 2614/2634 Introduction to Residential Technologies & Lab
    AHRM 2604/2624 House Planning & Lab
    AHRM 4984 Advanced House Planning
    AHRM 2675 Residential Property Managment I
    AHRM 3604 Family Housing
    AHRM 3624 House Planning II
    AHRM 4604 Housing: Energy and the Environment
    AHRM 4614 Advanced Household Equipment
    AHRM 4624 Advanced Kitchen and Bath Design
    AHRM 4634 Housing and Society
    AHRM 4664 Universal Design
    AHRM 4964 Field Study
    AHRM 4984 Housing and Society
    ART 2385-2386 Survey of the History of Western Art
    ECON 2005-2006 Principles of Economics
    ACIS 2004 Survey of Accounting
    MKTG 3104 Marketing Management
    MKTG 3604 Professional Selling
    In addition to these courses, students develop a supporting area of study by completing a minor or cognate.

Residential Property Management Option

    Career Advisor: R. C. Goss

    The residential property management option was developed in 1985 in response to industry demand for more and better-educated professionals. Today residential property management is a fast-growing career sector with hundreds of management positions available each year in communities that range from luxury apartment developments to innovative senior living communities. Graduates typically choose among several employment offers and enjoy quick advancement.

    The curriculum offers a wide-ranging program of study that includes specific courses in property management, as well as supporting courses in business, housing, and human relations. All students complete an internship where they gain real-world experience, make valuable career contacts, and explore different career areas. RPM’s very active advisory board visits campus twice yearly. Board members act as mentors and provide financial support for field trips, professional development, and scholarships. RPM seniors prepare for and take the National Apartment Association’s CAM (Certified Apartment Manager) exam. Graduating with this credential places new employees a year or more ahead of other entry-level peers.

Required:
AHRM 2675-2676 Residential Property Management
AHRM 2614 Introduction to Residential Technologies
AHRM 2404 Consumer Rights
AHRM 2504 Resource Management for Individuals and Families
AHRM 2604 House Planning
AHRM 3614 Maintenance for Property Managers
AHRM 4604 Energy and the Environment
AHRM 4664 Universal Design
AHRM 4674 Managing and Marketing Housing for Later Life
AHRM 4684 Advanced Property Management
AHRM 4694 Contemporary Issues in Property Management
AHRM 4964 Field Study
AHRM 4984 Special Study
ACIS 1504 Introduction to Business Information Systems
ACIS 2004 Survey of Accounting
ECON 2005-2006 Principles of Economics
FIN 3104 Introduction to Finance
MGT 3304 Management Theory and Leadership Practice
MKTG 3104 Marketing Management
UAP 4744 Principles of Real Estate
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Resource Management

Consumer Studies Option

Career Advisor: I. Leech

    The consumer studies option prepares students to enter a variety of careers in the public and private sectors. Central to these careers is the ability to analyze issues and problems from the perspectives of consumers, business, and government. Students learn to reasonably advocate consumer interests and to help consumers improve their well-being. They develop fundamental skills that are used to resolve problems faced by consumers in the market place and the work place.

    Graduates enter careers related to consumer affairs, marketing and sales, business management, and human resources. Required courses build a thorough understanding of households in the dual roles of producers and consumers that function within an international economic marketplace affected by government policy and regulation. Students study current events to track changing conditions and public policy. Additional courses develop skills for effectively processing and conveying information. A choice of controlled electives enables a student to tailor study to consumer business management, consumer public relations, consumer financial services, consumer housing counseling, or consumer health promotion.

    Consumer Studies students are provided a variety of learning experiences on- and off-campus. Through involvement with student professional associations, as well as relevant state and national organizations, students can develop leadership and organizational skills and network with active professionals. There are opportunities to relate classroom learning to the "real world" with projects and visits with industry, legislators, and regulators. An individualized study experience, typically an internship related to personal career interests, is required.

Required:
ACIS 1504 Introduction to Business Information Systems
AHRM 2304 Family Financial Management
AHRM 2404 Consumer Rights
AHRM 2504 Resource Management for Individuals and Families
AHRM 4314 Debtor-Creditor Relationships
AHRM 4404 Consumer Protection
AHRM 4414 Professionalism in Consumer Affairs
AHRM 4504 Advanced Resource Management
AHRM 4964, 4974, 4994 Individual Study
COMM 2004 Public Speaking
ECON 2005-2006 Principles of Economics
ENGL 3764 Technical Writing
HD 3004
or HD 3324
Human Development II
Family Relationships
MGT 3304 Management Theory and Leadership Practice
MKTG 3104 Marketing Management
STAT 3604 Statistics for the Social Sciences
LAHS 3004 Professional Seminar
Twenty one credit hours in one of the following areas:
Consumer Business Management
Consumer Public Relations
Consumer Financial Services
Consumer Housing Counseling
Consumer Health Promotion Family Financial Management
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Satisfactory Progress

Apparel Design Option and Merchandising Management Option: For satisfactory progress toward a degree, the following courses must be completed by the time 72 hours have been completed:
ENGL 1105-1106, ECON 2005-2006, PHYS, BIOL or CHEM (from approved Curriculum for Liberal Education, MATH 1015-1016 or 1525-1526; AHRM 1204, 1224, 2264, 2204, 2214, 2024, 2254; LAHS 1104; SOC 1004 or PSYC 2004; ACIS 2004. Apparel Design option also requires AHRM 2024 and 2254.

Housing Option: For satisfactory progress toward a degree, the following courses must be completed by the time the student has attempted 75 semester hours: AHRM 2254, AHRM 2604, AHRM 2624.

Residential Property Management Option: For satisfactory progress toward a degree, the following courses must be completed by the time the student has attempted 72 semester hours: ENGL 1105-1106; ECON 2005-2006; 6 hours of Natural Science; 6 hours of Curriculum for Liberal Education approved Humanities; MATH 1015-1016.

Consumer Studies Option: For satisfactory progress toward a degree, the following courses must be completed by the time the student has attempted 72 semester hours: ENGL 1105-1106; ECON 2005-2006; 6 hours of Natural Science; 6 hours of Curriculum for Liberal Education approved Humanities; MATH 1015-1016.

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Course Descriptions (AHRM)

1204: CLOTHING AND PEOPLE
A personal and societal approach to the study of clothing and its importance in people's lives. Social, psychological, and economic forces that affect clothing behavior of individuals and groups. Fundamentals of clothing and textiles importance to consumers. (3H,3C)

1224: BASIC APPAREL ASSEMBLY
Application of principles and concepts used in the assembly of basic apparel products. The relationship between garment quality and factors of time, construction techniques and resources. (1H,6L,3C)

2014: ADVANCED APPAREL ASSEMBLY
Application of principles and concepts of advanced apparel assembly to finished products. Prototype development and advanced dressmaking techniques applied to clothing for men, women, and children. (1H,4L,3C)

2024: APPAREL STRUCTURE AND FIT
Mastery of fitting and alteration concepts. Understanding of the principles and methods used in garment structure and design. Pre: 2014. (1H,6L,3C)

2204: INTRODUCTION TO TEXTILES
Structure, properties and basic production of textiles and textile components: natural and manufactured fibers; yarns; woven, knit, nonwoven fabrics; mechanical and chemical finishes; colorants and coloration methods. Influence on performance of apparel and interior textile products. Sophomore standing and one semester (lecture and lab) of university core requirement in Scientific Reasoning and Discovery is required. (3H,3C)

2214: APPAREL TEXTILES LABORATORY
Identification and characterization of textiles and textile components including: fabrics, finishes and coloration. Influence of these structural parameters on performance of apparel textiles. (3L,1C)

2224: INTERIOR TEXTILES LABORATORY
Identification and characterization of textiles and textile components used in draperies, upholstery, and carpets. Performance testing of interior textiles to determine suitability for a selected interior. (2L,1C)

2244 (AAEC 2244): FOOD AND CLOTHING: CULTURAL TRADITIONS, CONFLICTS AND POSSIBILITIES
Survey of basic ideas underlying values and cultural traditions expressed in food and clothing. Ethical perspectives in Western and Non-Western schools of thought. Application to issues involving food and clothings, such as product liability, food and clothing safety, animal rights and the use of fur, labor sweatshops, sourcing of inputs, endangered species, rain forests, consumer sovereignty, freedom and economic justice. Sophomore stand is required. (3H,3C) II.

2254: IDEA DEVELOPMENT & CREATIVITY
Development of an idea through the design process generated by creativity. Basic design elements and principles are examined in apparel and housing products. The design process is framed by needs assessment, prototype development, and evaluation. Emphasis on developing the students creativity abilities. Exploration of professional designers' ideas, creativity, and processes. (3H,3C)

2264: INTRODUCTION TO THE FASHION INDUSTRY
Organization and operation of producers and distributors and of career opportunities in the fashion industry. Basic principles governing fashion movement and change. Pre: 1204. (3H,3C)

2304: FAMILY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
Overview of family financial management. Analysis of financial situations of individuals and families; assessment of needs for cash and credit management, insurance, tax savings, and investments; introduction to components of a comprehensive family financial plan. (3H,3C)

2404: CONSUMER RIGHTS
Changing role of consumers in American society from the perspective of the consumer interest. Consumers' legal and moral rights, responsibilities and means for successfully obtaining redress of grievances. Processes of government regulation and policy making that affect consumers. Current consumer problems and issues in such areas as ripoffs and frauds, food, health care, product safety, banking, credit, housing, insurance and investments. (3H,3C)

2504: RESOURCE MANAGEMENT FOR INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES
Introduction to resource management concepts and theories. (3H,3C)

2604: HOUSE PLANNING
Principles of space planning and housing design in relation to individual and family activities, needs, and preferences. Introduction to house construction. Reading visual presentations of housing designs. (2H,2C)

2614: INTRODUCTION TO RESIDENTIAL TECHNOLOGIES
Principles underlying the selection, use and care of equipment and lighting in the home and the infrastructure that supports home technologies. (2H,2C)

2624: HOUSE PLANNING LABORATORY
Principles of visual presentation of housing designs. Introduction to hand and computer drafting. Co: 2604. (2L,1C)

2634: RESIDENTIAL TECHNOLOGIES LABORATORY
Basic principles of home technologies and their applications in the home. Co: 2614. (2L,1C)

2675-2676: RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
2675: The history of property management, roles and responsibilities of managers, developing effective marketing strategies, fair housing, and landlord-tenant law. 2676: The operation and management of residential properties including detailed examination of financial aspects of residential property management. (3H,3C)

2964: FIELD STUDY
Variable credit course.

2974: INDEPENDENT STUDY
Variable credit course.

2984: SPECIAL STUDY
Variable credit course.

3014: ADVANCED PATTERNMAKING
Advanced principles and techniques of flat pattern apparel structures. Illustration of apparel structures on the fashion figure. Construction of an original design. Must have prerequisites or equivalent. Pre: 2024. (1H,4L,3C)

3104: FASHION RETAILING CONCEPTS
Detailed investigation and analysis of the fundamentals of fashion merchandising concepts emphasizing problem solving at the retail level. Pre: 2264, (ACIS 2004 or ACIS 2115). (3H,3C)

3124: CLOTHING BEHAVIOR PATTERNS
The study of clothing behavior of individuals in relationship to their needs, values, attitudes, interests, and self-concepts. The roles of clothing and appearance in communication and social interaction. Pre: 1204, (PSYC 2004 or SOC 1004). (3H,3C)

3214: APPAREL QUALITY EVALUATION
Study of quality ready-to-wear apparel and factors that influence variations in the aesthetic and functional performance of the end product, including consumer perceptions and expectations, manufacturing processes and trends, and the physical components of the garment. Pre: 2204. (3H,3C)

3464 (EDHL 3464) (GEOG 3464) (HD 3464) (HUM 3464) (SOC 3464) (UAP 3464): APPALACHIAN COMMUNITIES
The concept of community in Appalachia using a multidisciplinary approach and experiential learning. Interrelationships among geographically, culturally, and socially constituted communities, public policy, and human development. 2000-level course in any cross-listing department is required. (2H,3L,3C)

3604: HOUSING AND THE CONSUMER
Overview of housing as it relates to consumer needs, values, lifestyles, norms and constraints. Includes structural and tenure alternatives, financial and legal considerations, house design, neighborhood choices, the home buying process, and future directions in housing. (3H,3C)

3614: MAINTENANCE FOR PROPERTY MANAGERS
Maintenance principles, routine maintenance procedures, and maintenance terminology used with commercial and residential property. Pre: 2676. (3H,3C)

3624: HOUSE PLANNING II
Principles of space planning, including activity analysis and user needs, as applied to residential settings. Graphic design solutions for specific areas of the home, including social, private, kitchen, and outdoor areas. Pre: 2254, 2604, 2624. (6L,3C)

3954: STUDY ABROAD
Variable credit course.

4014: SENIOR STUDIO
Principles and techniques of pattern design through the draping method. Pre: 3014. (1H,6L,3C)

4024: PORTFOLIO
The development and production of a professional design portfolio. Pre: 4014. (1H,3L,2C)

4034: HISTORY OF COSTUME
A study of costume which people of various cultures have worn throughout history. Pre: 1204. (3H,3C)

4044: PATTERN GRADING
Conceptual understanding and implementation of grading techniques, used in apparel engineering, for increasing and decreasing a standard size pattern to a range of sizes. Computer applications. Grading of an original design. Pre: 3014. (1H,4L,3C)

4204: INTRODUCTION TO TEXTILE EVALUATION
Analysis of the performance properties of fabrics. Importance of evaluation to product development, quality control, and specification of care requirements. Pre: 1224, 2204, 2214. (2H,3L,3C)

4214: ECONOMICS OF THE TEXTILE AND APPAREL INDUSTRY
Study of the various segments of the textile and apparel industry. Analysis of the market structure and functioning of each segment and of factors currently affecting the industry. Pre: 2204, ECON 2006. (3H,3C)

4224: FASHION ANALYSIS AND COMMUNICATION
Analysis of factors influencing fashion change and acceptance. Application of effective promotional activities to trade, national, and retail levels of fashion merchandising. Senior standing required. Pre: 2264, MKTG 3104. (3H,3C)

4244: NEW YORK FASHION STUDY TOUR
Integrative study of methods of operating at all levels within the fashion industry. Special emphasis on design, merchandising, and promotional activities. Seminars on campus and at pre-arranged appointments during a five-day stay in New York. Apparel Design major; Junior standing. Twelve hours of apparel design (AHRM) courses required. (3H,3C)

4254: TEXTILE PRODUCTION PROCESSES
Analysis of textile production processes will include focus on a particular aspect of production for each individual. Field work will be conducted at textile manufacturing plants. Pre: 4204. (2H,3L,3C)

4264: MERCHANDISING STRATEGIES
A senior capstone course providing students with experience in synthesizing and using course content learned throughout their apparel program. Includes projects in forecasting, product development and promotions as used in the apparel industry in preparing and positioning products in the market. Pre: 3104, 3214, 4224. (3H,3C)

4314: DEBTOR-CREDITOR RELATIONSHIPS
Examination of legal and operational aspects of debtor-creditor relationship from the perspective of businesses and debtors. Overview of the types of credit, access to credit, factors contributing to debt problems, and alternatives available for resolution. Focus on collection processes of federal and state bankruptcy laws and regulations. (3H,3C)

4324: FINANCIAL COUNSELING
Examination of debt and budgeting problems affecting families. Utilizes a problem-solving approach. Includes financial counseling strategies for coping with financial crises and becoming proactive in family financial management. (3H,3C)

4404: CONSUMER PROTECTION
Analysis of the effectiveness of consumer protection efforts. Examination of government laws, regulations, and agencies at the federal, state, and local levels, as well as the effectiveness of both business and private consumer protection efforts. (3H,3C)

4414: PROFESSIONALISM IN CONSUMER AFFAIRS
Roles, functions and responsibilities of consumer affairs professionals employed in business, government, and non-profit public/consumer interest organizations. Professional advocacy within employing organizations, managing consumer complaint handling systems and major consumer and career issues are analyzed. (3H,3C)

4504: ADVANCED RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
Theory and principles of the systems approach to resource management. Application to family problems of special life cycle or resource situations. (3H,3C)

4604: HOUSING, ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT
A study of the development and management of sustainable housing, emphasizing energy and environmental resource efficiency. (3H,3C)

4614: ADVANCED RESIDENTIAL TECHNOLOGIES
Residential technologies, such as, their impact on home activities, and how they can be successfully integrated into the house structure and design. Pre: 2614. (3L,3C)

4624: ADVANCED KITCHEN AND BATH DESIGN
Planning, design, and evaluation of residential kitchens and bathrooms, in relation to the total house plan. Emphasis on planning principles and technical requirements with attention to functional use of the spaces to meet the needs of people. Pre: 2614, 3624. (3H,3C)

4634: HOUSING AND SOCIETY
Economic and social importance of housing as a community concern within the United States, as well as the role of the government and profit/non- profit sectors. The need for public policy on housing in the context of different cultural perspectives of home, and the social issues that impact the community's supply of safe and affordable housing. Junior standing required. (3H,3C)

4664: UNIVERSAL DESIGN
Evaluation and design of commercial and residential environments with consideration for accessibility, adaptation, safety, and support of the user(s). (1H,1L,2C)

4674: MANAGING AND MARKETING HOUSING FOR LATER LIFE
Managing and marketing housing for later life, including active adult communities and assisted living facilities. Pre: (2675 or 3675), (2676 or 3676). (2H,2C)

4684: ADVANCED PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Property management considerations associated with condominiums, cooperatives, office and retail space as they relate to leases and negotiations, maintenance and marketing practices, and legal and fiduciary responsibilities of the property manager; and use of computer-assisted property management software. (3H,3C)

4694: CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Issues affecting property management, including ethics, professional management decisions, legislative issues, and current management practices. The course culminates in the analysis of an apartment community and development of a management plan. Pre: 4694 and senior standing in the Residential Property Management option or 5964 and graduate standing. Pre: 4964 or 5964. (3H,3C)

4964: FIELD STUDY
Variable credit course. X-grade allowed.

4974: INDEPENDENT STUDY
Variable credit course.

4984: SPECIAL STUDY
Variable credit course. X-grade allowed.

4994: UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
Variable credit course.


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Virginia Tech 2007-08 Undergraduate Course Catalog and Academic Policies